high school – The Education Store http://the-education-store.com/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 14:24:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://the-education-store.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png high school – The Education Store http://the-education-store.com/ 32 32 Ministry of Education to Release Report on Unified District Information System for Education Plus (UDISE+) 2020-21 https://the-education-store.com/ministry-of-education-to-release-report-on-unified-district-information-system-for-education-plus-udise-2020-21/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 08:00:51 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/ministry-of-education-to-release-report-on-unified-district-information-system-for-education-plus-udise-2020-21/ The detailed report of the Unified District Information System for Education Plus (UDISE+) 2020-21 will be released by the Ministry of Education. Check more information below. Ministry of Education to Release Report on Unified District Information System for Education Plus (UDISE+) 2020-21 The Ministry of Education (MoE) will release a detailed report on the Unified […]]]>

The detailed report of the Unified District Information System for Education Plus (UDISE+) 2020-21 will be released by the Ministry of Education. Check more information below.

Ministry of Education to Release Report on Unified District Information System for Education Plus (UDISE+) 2020-21

The Ministry of Education (MoE) will release a detailed report on the Unified District Information System for Education Plus (UDISE+) 2020-21 on School Education in India.

During the 2018-2019 year, the Department of School Education and Literacy developed the UDISE+ data collection system for schools to overcome the problems associated with the previous practice of manually filling in the data. data in paper format and feeding them to computers at district or block level via UDISE since the year 2012-13.

Improvements have been made to the UDISE+ system, particularly in the areas of data entry, mapping and verification.

Students and teachers in schools:

In 2020-2021, the total number of students enrolled in primary to upper secondary school education stood at 25.38 crore. There is an increase of 28.32 lakh enrollment from the 25.10 crore enrollment in 2019-20.

The gross enrollment ratio (GER), which measures the general level of participation, improved in 2020-21 at all levels of school education compared to 2019-20.

The GER by level in 2020-21 compared to 2019-20 is:

  • 92.2% compared to 89.7% in upper primary
  • 99.1% vs. 97.8% in primary
  • 79.8% vs. 77.9% in high school
  • 53.8% versus 51.4% respectively in upper secondary

96.96 lakh teachers are engaged in school education in 2020-2021. Compared to 2019-2020, this is an increase of approximately 8800 teachers.

  • In 2020-21, the pupil-teacher ratio (PTR) was 26 for primary, 19 for upper primary, 18 for secondary and 26 for upper secondary, showing an improvement since 2018-2019 .
  • The PTR for primary, upper primary, secondary and upper secondary was 28, 20, 21 and 30 respectively in 2018-19
  • In 2020-2021, over 12.2 million girls are enrolled from primary to upper secondary, which shows an increase of 11.8 lakh girls compared to girls’ enrollment in 2019-2020

Non-teaching staff

The number of non-teaching staff has also improved over the years.

The total number of non-employees in 2020-21 stood at 15.8 lakhs compared to 12.37 lakhs in 2018-19.

From 2018-19 to 2020-21, the number of accountants, library assistants, laboratory assistants, chief clerks and LDC/UDC employees increased from 5.79 lakh to 7.8 lakh .

Impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on registration:

In 2020-21, 39.7 lakh government aided students and private school students transferred to public schools.

(With inputs from GDP Delhi)

Read: NEET UG: upper age limit removed for all applicants, check details here

Read: Launch of a new vocational training center by Jharkhand CM

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KFUO, Ministry of Schools welcome new staff members https://the-education-store.com/kfuo-ministry-of-schools-welcome-new-staff-members/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 19:46:33 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/kfuo-ministry-of-schools-welcome-new-staff-members/ Pictured, left to right, Alan Freeman, associate director of LCMS School Ministry; the Reverend Dr. Matthew C. Harrison, president of the LCMS; and Reverend Doug Griebenaw, mission advocate for KFUO Radio. Freeman and Griebenaw were installed in their positions during the February 10 daily chapel at the LCMS International Center in St. Louis. (LCMS/Erik M. […]]]>
Pictured, left to right, Alan Freeman, associate director of LCMS School Ministry; the Reverend Dr. Matthew C. Harrison, president of the LCMS; and Reverend Doug Griebenaw, mission advocate for KFUO Radio. Freeman and Griebenaw were installed in their positions during the February 10 daily chapel at the LCMS International Center in St. Louis. (LCMS/Erik M. Lunsford)

On February 10, two new staff members were installed during the daily chapel at the LCMS International Center (IC) in St. Louis:

  • Alan Freeman, Associate Director of LCMS School Ministry; and
  • Reverend Doug Griebenaw, mission advocate for KFUO Radio.

Freeman comes to IC from the LCMS Missouri district, where he worked with 111 schools as an education manager. Previously, he served as principal of Concordia Preparatory School in Towson, Md. He holds a bachelor’s degree in secondary education from Concordia University, Nebraska, Seward, Neb.; a master’s degree in educational administration and supervision from Concordia University Wisconsin, Mequon, Wis.; an education specialist degree from the University of Nebraska at Kearney in Kearney, Neb.; and a doctorate in instructional leadership from the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Ark.

Freeman and his wife, Kristin — who serves in the life ministry at IC — have two children, Holly and Samuel, both graduates of St. Charles County Lutheran High School in St. Peters, Mo. After installation, Freeman said, “I look forward to working with the LCMS school ministry team and collaborating with all members of the Office of National Mission to joyfully support and serve church workers and ministries. schools as they spread the gospel message and train the next generation of Christian leaders.”

Griebenaw holds a bachelor’s degree in communications from the University of Denver. Prior to becoming a pastor, he worked for 10 years in nonprofit development and fundraising and served in the U.S. Navy Reserve as an Aviation Electrician’s Journeyman, receiving an honorable discharge in 2010. He attended Concordia Theological Seminary, Fort Wayne, graduating in 2016. His first calling was to Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church in El Centro, California.

Griebenaw and his wife Holly, a graphic designer, have two sons, Sam and Leo. Griebenaw said that as he transitioned from a parochial setting to IC, “I was concerned that the sense of family that a congregation and a pastor develops was missing in the office setting. I was pleasantly surprised to discover that IC still has a strong sense of “family” – a group of loving people, brought together by the same Gospel and united in the same mission: to serve the Body of Christ and to proclaim salvation by his name to a world in desperate need of the healing love of Christ! It is a rich blessing to be among such wonderful saints in the service of the Church of Christ.

Reverend Dr. Matthew C. Harrison, president of LCMS, preached for the service on 2 Peter 1:16: Lord Jesus Christ, but we have been eyewitnesses of his majesty. Referring to the 1973-74 Synod controversy over the inerrancy of Scripture, Harrison said, “We almost lost our souls, but the Lord was merciful.

Turning to Freeman and Griebenaw, Harrison said, “Scripture is Jesus’ own Word to us. We cannot take it for granted or overlook it in this building. Jesus himself believed that the scriptures came directly from God and had the authority of God. Jesus lived under this authority.

“We only believe what Jesus believed about the Bible. It must be our constant guide and consolation. You will have trials and frustrations. But no matter what you face, there is nothing to worry about. You have Christ and His Word. The Lord provides everything you need for your task.

Posted on March 3, 2022

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Threatening teachers is not a way to build a strong education system. https://the-education-store.com/threatening-teachers-is-not-a-way-to-build-a-strong-education-system/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 13:01:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/threatening-teachers-is-not-a-way-to-build-a-strong-education-system/ Threatening teachers is not a way to build a strong education system. (Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) Highland High School teacher Brock Edwards joins other educators, parents and public school advocates as they rally on the steps of the Utah Capitol on Tuesday, 22 February 2022. Advocates feel many anti-public school actions have […]]]>

Threatening teachers is not a way to build a strong education system.

(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) Highland High School teacher Brock Edwards joins other educators, parents and public school advocates as they rally on the steps of the Utah Capitol on Tuesday, 22 February 2022. Advocates feel many anti-public school actions have been taken by the legislature this year.

Too many members of the Utah legislature fail to see that each new attack on the professionalism, independence and funding of state educators can only hurt the children who spend so much of their young lives in charge of these teachers.

Or maybe they see it, but they don’t care. Politicians and activists may simply have too much to gain from denigrating teachers and giving undeserved credence to wild rumors about nefarious happenings in classrooms, labs and libraries.

To hear some members of our political class say it, public schools are hotbeds of anti-Caucasian rebellion, communism and gay sex. Acting on the basis of these absurd beliefs is not only a waste of time and resources, it can only undermine public confidence in an institution that is at the heart of a civilized society.

It’s not that the answer to the many woes of public education is simply to spend more money on it. This is not the case. And it’s not that our schools don’t have, no less than any other human institution, problems, weak links, poor performance and a need for supervision. They do.

But there is a huge gap between reasonable legislative oversight and the current wave of right-wing activism that serves no purpose other than to get parents, taxpayers and employers to turn their backs on public education. and start putting their faith and our money into alternatives. Alternatives which, at best, will divert resources from the schools which will still have the task of educating the vast majority of our children and which, at worst, will seek to protect future generations from the understanding of the world that they will not only live in, but expected to run.

Heidi Matthews, president of the Utah Education Association, said 93% of its members plan to leave the profession after the current school year. It’s not just the poor pay, which has always been a given for Utah teachers, but the blatant disrespect from lawmakers, activists and far too many parents — most of whom have no idea. what happens in a school on a day-to-day basis. .

Even though Matthews’ figure is exaggerated, it still points to a problem that will cripple our public education system and handicap children in particular, as well as our culture and economy in general. A problem that will not be solved by harassing educators and cutting spending.

Utah is not alone in suffering from a decision by its politicians to win votes and raise funds by pretending to stand between innocent children and an education system that, in the feverish imaginations of these activists, exists to make white children feel inferior, to undermine their belief in the United States as perfect and unmatched, and to replace their parents’ morals and standards with an exotic belief system that involves many gender changes.

The 2022 session of the Utah legislature began with a reckless decision to cut more than $160 million in income tax revenue, the stream dedicated by the state Constitution to education. He then toyed with proposals to warn teachers that they can be hounded, fired, and even prosecuted for teaching truths about human behavior and American history that might make some overprotective parents uncomfortable. .

The good news is that these harassment bills appear to be stalled in committee. There’s also reason to hope that a new measure allowing parents to take taxpayers’ money with them if they choose to enroll their children in private schools – Rep. Candice Pierucci HB331 — can also get lost in the legislative process. And that, even if it passes, faces a probable and well-deserved veto from Governor Spencer Cox.

There are still possible victories for public education. One of them is a measure of Representative Steve Waldrip and Senator Ann miller – HB193 – This would put $47 million into an effort to provide full-day kindergarten in all public school districts in the state. The bill has already passed the House with a good margin and is also expected to be supported in the Senate.

Participation would be voluntary, but there is no doubt that a strengthened kindergarten can go a long way in preparing young children for the rest of their school careers. It is something that would make school more fluid for these children, their classmates, their teachers and the education system as a whole.

It is reasonable and appropriate to consider different ideas about how best to strengthen Utah’s public education system. They don’t all have to be very expensive, and they have to leave room for charter schools and other paths to innovation and alternatives.

But the Utahs should be in contact with their legislators and governorto let them know that every proposal for our schools should be aimed not at undermining our system but at building one that is stronger and better able to serve all children with a kaleidoscope of needs.

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Principals smell a RAT in the ministry’s test promise https://the-education-store.com/principals-smell-a-rat-in-the-ministrys-test-promise/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 21:24:04 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/principals-smell-a-rat-in-the-ministrys-test-promise/ Education Rapid antigen tests are essential to keep schools running smoothly, so why are they happening at such a slow pace? As the country enters phase 3 and the main tools of the public health response shift from isolation and PCR tests to rapid antigen tests (RATs), schools are wondering why they have to wait […]]]>

Education

Rapid antigen tests are essential to keep schools running smoothly, so why are they happening at such a slow pace?

As the country enters phase 3 and the main tools of the public health response shift from isolation and PCR tests to rapid antigen tests (RATs), schools are wondering why they have to wait two days to put the hand on tests that might enable them to keep their doors open.

As of Wednesday, RATs have been the main test at community testing centers across Auckland to help meet demand as the Omicron outbreak continues to grow.

With a faster turnaround time and cheaper cost – although less sensitive than PCR – RATs are a crucial tool for institutions like schools and prisons, where staff forced into self-isolation can have consequences disastrous on administrators trying to stay the course.

In bulletins released by the Ministry of Education this week, the ministry said there would be many more RATs used in schools once the country enters phase 3, with PCR tests kept for children. people who are sick or more susceptible to viruses.

Earlier this week, the ministry announced that 200,000 RATs had been received for distribution to schools, with 480,000 on their way within the week. Speaking from Porirua this morning, Education Minister Chris Hipkins said over 700,000 RATs had already been distributed to the Department of Education network, ready for distribution to schools.

Currently, RATs are available to schools meeting the requirements of the Close Contact Exemption Program – the emergency situation in which teachers must quickly test the antigen to exit close contact status so that the school continues to monitor the children.

For principals such as Vaughan Couillault of Papatoetoe High School, the promise of government-provided rapid tests for his school seems like little more than a promise.

Delays in delivering tests to schools and strict requirements on how desperate a school is before being eligible mean that the rollout of the RAT will only help schools in very specific situations.

“The way it’s currently set up is not easily accessible, it’s not fast and it’s not really going to help in many situations outside of early childhood education,” he said. he declares. “You pretty much have to hand over your firstborn to get one.”

Papatoetoe High School, like many schools in the Auckland area, has been hit hard by staff having to self-isolate, with almost a third of its teachers expected to stay home around the middle of this week .

A lack of access to rapid tests has forced the school to do rapid scheduling gymnastics, with full-year levels being asked to stay home on certain days.

Even so, the Department of Education has stressed that RATs should only be used as a last resort – likely due to their nature of only picking up higher viral loads.

“There is a risk of close contact returning to work with children, so consider carefully any use of rapid antigen tests for this purpose,” reads the ministry’s bulletin to schools.

Speaking on Friday morning, Hipkins doubled down on the message of last resort, saying the government wanted teachers to “stay home and reduce the risk to themselves and the students they work with. It would be just one absolute last resort if we had no one else who could go to schools to care for children who had nowhere to go for us to seek to use this testing program.”

He acknowledged the challenges of blended learning (some students learn at home and others in the classroom), but said schools had proven they were up to the task over the past two years.

“There’s going to be a bit of a twist,” he said. “We all need to be resilient and adaptable.”

The ministry suggests schools explore a range of options before applying for RATs, such as substitute teachers, unregistered teachers who hold limited authority to teach, rearrange classes and schedules, or arrange for staff non-teaching provides supervision of distance education.

“You can’t get [RATs] if you have no more humans on the ground to take care of the children who have no choice but to be in school,” Couillault said.

He wants to see more autonomy for school principals to deal with the situation themselves.

“Send me a box of them and let us get on with our work,” he said. “Stop messing with middlemen – or if you don’t have them, just say you don’t have them.”

Speaking to reporters on Tuesday, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern refuted the idea that schools did not have their own autonomy to decide whether they wanted to use RATs.

“We now have the flexibility in the system for teachers if their school determines that it is necessary for them to be back in school despite close contact, they will have the option of bringing them back to school,” said she declared. “But we want schools to think about whether this is something they want to do, and they are in the best position to make that decision.”

It is indisputable that the Close Contact Exemption Scheme exists, and indeed schools will have to judge whether they meet the criteria and are eligible to receive their share of testing. However, will every school that says it needs a box of RATs get what they want?

National Education Party spokeswoman Erica Stanford questioned whether enough RATs were earmarked for schools in the first place.

“There are supposedly 200,000 rapid tests distributed in schools,” she said earlier this week. “With around 2,500 schools in New Zealand, this averages less than 80 tests per school. It is not enough for the 70,000 teachers and 800,000 students we have in this country.

‘Every principal I spoke to would decide in a heartbeat to take quick tests so teachers don’t have to self-isolate and can keep their doors open to students,’ the door said. – Spokesperson for the National Education Party, Erica Stanford. Photo: Lynn Grieveson

She said Ardern’s assurances that schools would be able to make the decision to use RATs were misleading.

“She never really said it wasn’t for all teachers,” Stanford said. “It’s only for once that a school is practically closed and you have to open a few classes for students of essential workers who cannot be at home alone. She never really says that.

As things stand, schools will need to get in touch with their education coordinators and find out if they will be allowed to get enough RATs to keep classrooms open.

“Schools are upset and confused,” Stanford said. “They want to be able to test teachers to bring them back to school.”

She predicts the rules will change, allowing more teachers to get their hands on a RAT within weeks if stocks rise. This suggests that his theory is that the tightly controlled distribution of RATs in schools has more to do with a lack of supply than adherence to a strict security regime.

Hipkins almost promised the regime would relax once RAT stocks rise this morning, saying that as supply increases, schools could use more.

Whatever the reason for the current lockdowns, if it takes a school 48 hours to receive the tests, Couillault wonders if the “fast” epithet is still appropriate.

“Let’s just say I needed it to make sure six kids I have here are supervised,” he said. “It would take me 48 hours to get my hands on it.”

With nearly 50 secondary schools across Auckland reporting active cases within the student body and schools of all kinds across the country approaching 500, the ease with which they can obtain a box of RATs may decide how many are forced to close in the coming weeks.

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CT University System Seeks Budget Help as Enrollment Falls https://the-education-store.com/ct-university-system-seeks-budget-help-as-enrollment-falls/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 22:18:17 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/ct-university-system-seeks-budget-help-as-enrollment-falls/ HARTFORD — The state university system is looking to the state to help fill a budget gap that could affect Connecticut’s most vulnerable students. As enrollment declines and the pandemic continues to impact higher education, Connecticut State’s colleges and universities initially projected a $268 million shortfall attributed to labor contracts and the loss of tuition […]]]>

HARTFORD — The state university system is looking to the state to help fill a budget gap that could affect Connecticut’s most vulnerable students.

As enrollment declines and the pandemic continues to impact higher education, Connecticut State’s colleges and universities initially projected a $268 million shortfall attributed to labor contracts and the loss of tuition fees. Since then, Gov. Ned Lamont has proposed a $93 million set aside that officials told the Legislature Tuesday was insufficient to fill those budget holes.

“While we appreciate the Governor’s generous support for our system and our students — there are several important and worthwhile investments in the Governor’s proposed budget — the system is still expected to experience a deficit of $174 million,” Terrence said. Cheng, chairman of the system.

While some lawmakers have questioned when there will be fewer students to serve, Cheng pointed out that the system combines access, quality and affordability for students who generally continue to live and work in the state.


“We can’t take this for granted,” Cheng told the appropriations committee, which will make recommendations to Lamont on his plan in the coming months.

The proposed budget adjustments also include financial support for specific initiatives, ranging from student financial aid to workforce development programs. But system officials said that still leaves non-discretionary costs on the table.

“These – while substantial and welcome – do not help us close our base deficit that we face for the coming year as a result of the pandemic, and the confluence of this with rising marginal costs and wages,” said Ben Barnes, the system’s chief financial officer.

One of the most significant impacts of the pandemic has been on full-time equivalent enrollment, which fell 6% at community colleges and nearly 9% at state universities from fall 2020 to 2021. , according to system data.

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Over 90% of students nationwide have returned to school: ministry https://the-education-store.com/over-90-of-students-nationwide-have-returned-to-school-ministry/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 02:25:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/over-90-of-students-nationwide-have-returned-to-school-ministry/ Up to 93.71 percent of preschool through high school students nationwide had returned to school as of February 14, after a long hiatus due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Children play in a kindergarten in Kien Giang province. The Ministry of Education and Training (MoET) reported that 85.71% of kindergarten children have returned to school. The […]]]>

Up to 93.71 percent of preschool through high school students nationwide had returned to school as of February 14, after a long hiatus due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Children play in a kindergarten in Kien Giang province.

The Ministry of Education and Training (MoET) reported that 85.71% of kindergarten children have returned to school. The rate was 93.65% among primary school students, 94.41% among middle school students and 99% among high school students.

He added that all provinces and cities have made plans to reopen schools in February.

As of February 14, nine localities had not reopened kindergartens, namely Hau Giang, Tra Vinh, Hung Yen, Vinh Long, Hanoi, Phu Yen, Da Nang, An Giang and Tien Giang.

Meanwhile, primary school students in Hau Giang, An Giang, Da Nang and Tien Giang had not resumed face-to-face learning.

All 63 provinces and cities have resumed in-person teaching and learning for junior and senior high school students.

The MoET noted that 100% of higher education institutions have also drawn up reopening plans.

All localities and their education and training departments have constructed and applied pandemic safety criteria for face-to-face learning. They have prepared flexible teaching plans in adaptation to the COVID-19 situation. In addition, the infrastructures have also been fitted out to welcome the students again, according to the ministry.

Source: VNA

All schools in Vietnam to open by this month: ministry

All schools in Vietnam to open by this month: Ministry

All 63 cities and provinces across the country plan to reopen schools this month after being closed for months to help contain the spread of COVID-19, the Ministry of Education and Training revealed overnight. of February 7.

Mixed emotions for parents as children return to school

Mixed emotions for parents as children return to school

As Hanoi’s children finally return to school after a long period of online learning, parents are filled with mixed emotions.

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Bengal school vandalized after authorities allegedly banned girls from wearing headscarves https://the-education-store.com/bengal-school-vandalized-after-authorities-allegedly-banned-girls-from-wearing-headscarves/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 04:08:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/bengal-school-vandalized-after-authorities-allegedly-banned-girls-from-wearing-headscarves/ A school in West Bengal’s Murshidabad district has been vandalized after a hijab controversy. (Representative image: Reuters Pupils and residents alleged that school authorities asked girls not to wear the hijab inside school premises News18 Murshidabad Last update:February 13, 2022, 09:41 HST FOLLOW US ON: The Hijab line entered West Bengal with a school in […]]]>

A school in West Bengal’s Murshidabad district has been vandalized after a hijab controversy. (Representative image: Reuters

Pupils and residents alleged that school authorities asked girls not to wear the hijab inside school premises

  • News18 Murshidabad
  • Last update:February 13, 2022, 09:41 HST
  • FOLLOW US ON:

The Hijab line entered West Bengal with a school in Murshidabad district banning female students from wearing the hijab and burqa in class. Following this order, the inhabitants vandalized the school premises. The incident happened on Saturday at Bahutali High School in Suti district of Murshidabad.

Students and residents alleged that school authorities had instructed girls not to wear the hijab inside school premises. This direction sparked controversy and agitated locals reportedly tried to throw stones inside the school and beat up teachers. The police intervened with tear gas and charges of lathi. According to the media, 18 people have been arrested so far.

Later, the police held a meeting with parents and school authorities and the school said it did not prohibit the wearing of hijab inside the premises. The case was settled after negotiations between the school administration and the students’ guardians.

The incident comes amid the ongoing hijab row on high school and college campuses in parts of Karnataka, leading to protests from locals. Higher education institutions are set to reopen on February 14 after being closed for three days in accordance with a government decree.

A PIL was filed in the Supreme Court on Saturday following Karnataka’s ‘hijab’ row and it seeks direction from the Centre, States and Union Territories to implement a common dress code for staff and students of registered educational institutions to ensure equality and promote brotherhood and national integration.

Read all the latest news, breaking news and special offers: Live IPL 2022 Auction Countdown Update | Live updates from IPL Mega Auction here.

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Details and theories are released as authorities announce arrest in McKinley High School violence https://the-education-store.com/details-and-theories-are-released-as-authorities-announce-arrest-in-mckinley-high-school-violence/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/details-and-theories-are-released-as-authorities-announce-arrest-in-mckinley-high-school-violence/ Police and prosecutors have confirmed the arrest and arraignment Thursday night of a 17-year-old, in connection with a violent fight outside McKinley High School on Wednesday afternoon that stabbed a 14-year-old student and shot a security guard. The suspect, whose name has not been released, is charged as a minor with attempted second degree murder […]]]>

Police and prosecutors have confirmed the arrest and arraignment Thursday night of a 17-year-old, in connection with a violent fight outside McKinley High School on Wednesday afternoon that stabbed a 14-year-old student and shot a security guard.

The suspect, whose name has not been released, is charged as a minor with attempted second degree murder and first degree assault. The male suspect, who is also believed to be a McKinley student, was being held in a juvenile detention center ahead of a bond hearing scheduled for Monday morning before Youth Court Judge Kelly Brinkworth.

The attacker is accused of being part of a group that fought outside the school after classes had ended for the day. He was arrested Thursday evening and indicted shortly before midnight.

“We have video of the incident. We have statements. We have witnesses. Investigators have done a very good job of getting to the point, while working with the district attorney’s office, to get to the point where we could lay those charges,” Buffalo Police Assistant Commissioner Joseph Gramaglia said during a Friday morning briefing. “We were on somebody pretty quickly. It just took a little while to gather enough evidence to make this arrest.

At first it was believed that two people, a student and a security guard stepping in to break up the fight, had been shot dead. It was determined when the juvenile victim was taken to surgery that she was not shot, but rather stabbed. The teenager, according to Mayor Byron Brown, was in stable condition Friday morning.

The security guard, who was shot in the leg, was treated and released that day.

Police said Friday morning that further investigation led them to discover that a second student, aged 13, had been grazed in the arm by gunfire during the violence. The shooter was still at large Friday morning.

“First and foremost, we are still investigating whether or not other people were involved in the assault on the victim. In addition to this, we also believe there was a separate individual who had a weapon and fired the shots that hit the security guard in the leg, and also allegedly struck another student, grazing him in the arm,” said Erie County District Attorney John Flynn.

Crimestoppers is offering a reward of up to $5,000 for information leading to an arrest or indictment.

Brown, during his remarks inside Buffalo Police Headquarters, offered some theories about an increase in violence.

“First, I think the pandemic is impacting some of the increase in violence that we’re seeing not just here in this community, but we’re seeing across the country. People are angry. People are frustrated. People are scared. And in particular, I think our young people have been affected,” Brown said. “Furthermore, it is clear that there are simply too many illegal guns on the streets in communities across the country, urban, suburban and rural.”

Flynn further suggests that the state’s criminal justice reforms have backfired. He specifically points to the state’s “Raise the Age” reform, which raised the legal age of criminal responsibility to 18. The reform, enacted in April 2017, aimed to ensure that non-violent young offenders receive evidence-based intervention and treatment.

While acknowledging the roles that poverty and dysfunctional home environments can play in influencing a young offender’s behavior, Flynn said Friday that what has happened since these reforms were introduced is a loss of accountability.

“Over the past two or three years, we have not only seen a significant increase in the number of minors charged with crimes, but also a significant increase in the number of minors who are victims of crimes,” Flynn said. “What we need to start doing is start focusing our attention on the victims of crimes and not necessarily the defendants. And we need to start holding the accused accountable for their actions. »

The DA went on to say that it deals with a young offender who, for example, might be caught with a bag or marijuana or who breaks into a car to sleep in because the teenager is homeless. In these cases, he insists, he wants to help them.

In cases involving violent crimes, however, he says it is necessary to implement “tough love”.

“We have to have some responsibility here. We have to have, using a school term and an education term, we have to have a little more discipline,” Flynn said. “And if my dear friends from Albany don’t want to be more disciplined, well, that’s why you made me prosecutor. I guess I will.

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McMinn authorities investigate threat at local high school https://the-education-store.com/mcminn-authorities-investigate-threat-at-local-high-school/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/mcminn-authorities-investigate-threat-at-local-high-school/ Feb. 3 – The McMinn County Sheriff’s Office in Athens, Tenn., had deputies on the McMinn County High School campus Thursday morning due to a reported threat to authorities Wednesday night. The threat was related to a ball game the school had with another school, McMinn County Schools Secondary Education Supervisor Roger Freeman said in […]]]>

Feb. 3 – The McMinn County Sheriff’s Office in Athens, Tenn., had deputies on the McMinn County High School campus Thursday morning due to a reported threat to authorities Wednesday night.

The threat was related to a ball game the school had with another school, McMinn County Schools Secondary Education Supervisor Roger Freeman said in a telephone interview Thursday.

“This was a report that the sheriff’s department had received that there was a possible threatening situation that occurred at a baseball game a few nights ago,” Freeman said.

According to a statement posted on McMinn County Sheriff Joe Guy’s Facebook page, school deputies are “investigating an alleged threat to McMinn [County] High School,” he posted. The officers are present at the school “simply out of caution as we take any threat, however vague or unfounded, seriously and the safety of our schools is of vital importance. for us”.

Guy said the investigation is ongoing as officers continue to work with school officials.

Freeman said the school was never closed and parents received notification Thursday morning about the presence of law enforcement at the school after some parents called to ask what was going on.

No charges have been filed so far, Guy said in a follow-up email. The sheriff said information about the threat came from students who said they saw or heard something at the baseball game, but he could not provide details.

Freeman said the threat had nothing to do with the county school board’s recent vote to remove the Pulitzer Prize-winning book, “Maus: A Survivor’s Tale” from the system‘s eighth-grade curriculum or the conversations around its deletion.

Guy confirmed that the matter had nothing to do with the book being pulled from the program.

Contact Ben Benton at bbenton@timesfreepress.com or 423-757-6569. Follow him on Twitter @BenBenton.

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Department of Education continues COVID surveillance strategy – Williams | News https://the-education-store.com/department-of-education-continues-covid-surveillance-strategy-williams-news/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 05:06:22 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/department-of-education-continues-covid-surveillance-strategy-williams-news/ WEST OFFICE: DESPITE RECENT calls for the government to suspend face-to-face classes due to concerns over the spread of COVID-19, in particular the Omicron variant having been confirmed in Jamaica, Education Minister Fayval Williams , said his ministry would continue with its current strategy of monitoring schools. ‘ adherence to COVID-19 protocols. Williams was talking […]]]>

WEST OFFICE:

DESPITE RECENT calls for the government to suspend face-to-face classes due to concerns over the spread of COVID-19, in particular the Omicron variant having been confirmed in Jamaica, Education Minister Fayval Williams , said his ministry would continue with its current strategy of monitoring schools. ‘ adherence to COVID-19 protocols.

Williams was talking to the gleaner Thursday, following the official handover ceremony of the Jamaica Social Investment Fund (JSIF) Salt Spring Safe Passage project, at Salt Spring Elementary School in St James.

CLOSE MONITORING

“Our responsibility is to bring our children back into the face-to-face environment in the safest way possible, to stay up to date with what is happening in our schools, and we receive weekly reports which give us an idea of ​​what that is happening. Although we have seen reports from some of our schools that some teachers test positive or have been exposed to people with COVID, or some students who show symptoms of runny noses, etc., in these cases teachers and the students stayed home,” Williams said resolutely.

“We are monitoring the situation and sharing this data with the Department of Health and Wellness. So far in our schools, based on the reports and spot checks we do, we are implementing face-to-face learning in the safest way possible,” added Williams.

On Tuesday, the Medical Association of Jamaica (MAJ) recommended the government suspend face-to-face classes for some time. Such a move would seem particularly cautious with the revelation that Omicron’s highly transmissible variant of COVID-19 has been confirmed to be in Jamaica.

However, the Jamaica Teachers’ Association (JTA) countered this recommendation, saying the learning loss experienced by students during the pandemic is too great.

Regarding the welcome of the Jamaican student population to take the COVID-19 vaccine, Williams noted that the number of high school students who have taken the vaccine has increased since December.

“In our high schools, we continue to see the percentage of vaccinated students increase. When we finished December last year, it was 31%. 100 of students; but, the last time I looked was about a week ago, we were at about 37%. So we’re seeing kids still taking the vaccines,” Williams said.

The Minister for Education also said that consultations are currently underway to determine whether to postpone exams such as the primary exit profile, and that an announcement will be made to this effect, once a decision will have been agreed with the stakeholders.

Last May, the United Nations Children’s Fund lambasted the Caribbean Examinations Council (CXC) for its decision to continue the June 2021 session of its examination period. CXC was then pressured by teacher lobby groups to hold an easier exam, as student preparation would have been badly affected by the pandemic.

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