education sector – The Education Store http://the-education-store.com/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 14:24:13 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://the-education-store.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png education sector – The Education Store http://the-education-store.com/ 32 32 Government’s education sector reforms deemed insufficient https://the-education-store.com/governments-education-sector-reforms-deemed-insufficient/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 13:46:28 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/governments-education-sector-reforms-deemed-insufficient/ Pakistan’s Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) government came to power claiming that it would bring reforms in the system in addition to revolutionizing the education and health sectors. Not to mention the civil service reforms, nothing special happened in the education system, except for the transfer of administrative departments from the Civil Secretariat. According to the documents, the […]]]>

Pakistan’s Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) government came to power claiming that it would bring reforms in the system in addition to revolutionizing the education and health sectors. Not to mention the civil service reforms, nothing special happened in the education system, except for the transfer of administrative departments from the Civil Secretariat.

According to the documents, the Punjab government has decided to relocate the two departments of education – higher education and school education – from the main secretariat to Lawrence Road. An esplanade was purchased to house these offices. According to an official letter addressed to the two Secretaries of Education, the Chief Secretary ordered them to move there. The HED would be on the first, second, and third floors while the SED would be on the basement, ground, fourth, and fifth floors.

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The Higher Education Department (HED) is located at the Main Secretariat while the School Education Department (SED) is located in the former Planning and Development Building. Previously, two health departments namely Primary and Secondary Health Care and Specialist Health Care were also moved from the Secretariat to Birdwood Road and Lawrence Road respectively.

The PTI government had affirmed that there would be a single, universal education policy. Additionally, he also formed a task force to bring about massive reforms in the age-old colonial civil service. However, he could add no feather to his hat other than introducing the unique curriculum. It was a good step towards unity and nationalism.

In the health sector, health insurance cards have been issued throughout the province. The government claimed that this initiative was another of its achievements. When we discuss the side of education, there is no universal education policy that could revolutionize ignored public sector institutions. All colleges and universities run education in the traditional way.

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The private sector, relative to the public sector, leads in all sectors, including education. Education has never been a priority area for governments, whether dictatorial or democratic. A former SED secretary told this scribe that for more than three years in power, the PTI could not bring sustained policies to the ignored education sector.

Although the government did not change ministers for the HED and SED, secretaries were frequently transferred. Sometimes the departments operated under a provisional arrangement.

Take the example of the current HED secretary, Syed Javed Iqbal Bukhari. When he reached the retirement pension, instead of assigning a full-time secretary, the head of the food department was given an additional charge from the HED office. From Imran Sikandar to Ghulam Farid, many secretaries were transferred to the SED. The same was true for the HED.

Nazira’s education was another initiative. Although the government wanted to teach the Holy Quran through the existing teaching staff, the court ordered the recruitment of separate Qaris for this purpose. The provincial government lacked science, math and information technology teachers. It also lacked fully equipped science laboratories and classrooms for early childhood education.

Moreover, when this newspaper spoke with a seasoned teacher, Shahbaz Ali, he opined that the government recruited “civil servants”, not teachers. They carry out their duties like other government employees and leave the premises. He said there should be a mechanism to drive out true teachers among the highly educated lot and there should be different merit for teachers.

When recruiting teachers, psychologists must advise recruiting committees whether or not a candidate is fit to practice the profession. Moreover, he felt that the teachers were depressed. He said they were an ignored segment of society and they themselves were also responsible for the sad state of the education system.

Iftikhar Ahmad, another teacher, said that the main job of the teacher is to motivate students, but now we see that despite all the efforts, enrollment in public schools has been declining. An educationally conducive and productive environment in publicly funded institutions must be ensured. He said government teachers are comparatively better paid than teachers in the private sector. But, he said they themselves were deeply unmotivated. They compare themselves to other segments like engineers, doctors and civil servants and are victims of inferiority complex.

In addition, governments hire teachers for extra-curricular activities like census, electoral duties, voter registration, exam duties and much more. There is no incentive for real teachers who really promote talent and motivate their students. They don’t just pass the time, rather they prepare students to be a good generation.

Tahira, an overseas-educated teacher, said some teachers prefer to get involved in politics. These days, teachers are on the road to demand an increase in their salaries, a disparity allowance in addition to the regularization of their services, and much more. Wasn’t it a crime for teachers to be absent from their lessons, she wondered. The loss of students didn’t bother them, she said.

In addition, the government should enforce the newly notified delisting policy on dead wood present in the community. Those who prefer politics to performance in schools should also receive show cause notices, she demanded. The need she suggested is to introduce a system of conductive education, developed in Hungary by András Petö. In this system, teachers or conductors teach children and adults with motor impairments to function independently. They guide them to achieve their goals in their own way.

During the period of former Chief Minister Shehbaz Sharif, education authorities were constituted at the district level. Even after many years, these authorities did not have a significant impact as education remained centralized. Decision-making should be delegated to district education authorities. They should have prepared their own education plans, but the school education department remained in charge.

Babar Ali, a factory manager, said teachers were on the road.

“They announced that they were organizing protest demonstrations in front of the civil secretariat. There is, it seems, no difference between clerics and teachers because the mode of claims is the same. Both are chanting slogans, hanging banners and boycotting their workplaces,” he said. He added that teachers should perform first and then demand.

Ejaz Hussain, Deputy Headmaster of Dar-e-Arqam School, said there should be very strict mechanism and criteria for enrolment, training, regularization and promotion of teachers. He added that the government should also carry out a survey of the children of government teachers, whether they are enrolled in public sector schools or in the private sector.

Surprisingly, he argued, the teaching community did not like enrolling their own children in public schools. “How can they motivate other parents to send their children to public sector schools,” Hussain was asked. The government should surrender to the protesters, he predicted.

The government should, at a minimum, notify a policy for the education sector and the teaching community that serves in the government sector. To revolutionize the education sector, there can be a separate education group in higher departments like customs, police, etc. Moreover, the government should also organize their training, refresher courses and engage them in research-related activities. Otherwise, the billions of rupees spent in the education sector would remain counterproductive and the state-funded system would lag far behind the commercialized private sector.

About the Author

Javed Iqbal is a special correspondent covering the government of Punjab with a particular focus on bureaucracy. He uncovered a number of mega-scams while working with mainstream media. He tweets @javedjahangiri and can be reached at [email protected]

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Bayelsa will improve the education sector with the results of the summit https://the-education-store.com/bayelsa-will-improve-the-education-sector-with-the-results-of-the-summit/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 15:30:38 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/bayelsa-will-improve-the-education-sector-with-the-results-of-the-summit/ The Bayelsa State Government has expressed its commitment to implementing the outcomes of the first education summit held recently in the state to achieve a viable education plan and policy in 15 years for the state. Education Commissioner Gentle Emelah told Yenagoa on Monday that the implementation will involve partnerships and collaborations to achieve the […]]]>

The Bayelsa State Government has expressed its commitment to implementing the outcomes of the first education summit held recently in the state to achieve a viable education plan and policy in 15 years for the state.

Education Commissioner Gentle Emelah told Yenagoa on Monday that the implementation will involve partnerships and collaborations to achieve the summit’s goals to address short, medium and long-term education challenges.

He was flanked by the ministry’s permanent secretary, Christopher Ehwrudjakpo; Education Summit Committee Co-Chair Alice Atuwo; secretary, Stella Ugolo and the commissioner’s technical adviser, Warmate Idikio.

Emelah said the summit, which was themed “Optimizing delivery, performance and sustainability of results in the education sector”, was a success.

He said, “The summit generally agreed that Bayelsa State has taken a very bold and just step to address its educational challenges to improve the delivery of education.

“It was stated that the outcomes of the summit should be adapted, conscientiously followed up and implemented to achieve the overall goals of providing a concise and actionable education plan and policy, including future partnerships and collaborations.”

According to him, the summit reiterated the need for a critical assessment of current educational structures, practices, goals and principles to align them with the government’s new aspirations for educational transformation.

He said the summit affirmed the relevance of the ten themes that were framed to examine the issues, problems, prospects and way forward in the education sector.

Emelah highlighted themes such as access to education; school administration; financing and financing of education; infrastructural situation, requirements and needs; quality assurance and quality control; study programme; creation and management of primary and secondary schools; establishment and management of higher institutions; teaching standards and stipulations; and issues relating to teacher salaries, incentives and motivation.

He further noted that the summit proposed the establishment of a committee of professionals, technocrats and stakeholders to carefully review all presentations, opinions and recommendations, and come up with an actionable report.

The Commissioner commended Governor Douye Diri for his support and commended former President Goodluck Jonathan for his outstanding keynote address, as well as other eminent scholars, partners and stakeholders for their contributions to the success of the summit.

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How can the education sector protect itself against the top three cybersecurity challenges in 2022? – FE News https://the-education-store.com/how-can-the-education-sector-protect-itself-against-the-top-three-cybersecurity-challenges-in-2022-fe-news/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 07:40:09 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/how-can-the-education-sector-protect-itself-against-the-top-three-cybersecurity-challenges-in-2022-fe-news/ The recent pandemic has brought significant changes to day-to-day working life and the way individuals go about their lives in general. The rise of hybrid working and working from home (WFH), in particular, has brought many challenges for security administrators. Likewise, the growth of distance learning has increased the risks in educational networks. Schools, universities, […]]]>

The recent pandemic has brought significant changes to day-to-day working life and the way individuals go about their lives in general. The rise of hybrid working and working from home (WFH), in particular, has brought many challenges for security administrators.

Likewise, the growth of distance learning has increased the risks in educational networks. Schools, universities, and research centers are attractive targets for cybercriminals because they often lack resources from a security perspective. In fact, recent data shows a 93% increase in cyberattacks targeting the education sector in the UK.

We have seen an upsurge in attacks since educational institutions were forced to configure their systems remotely due to the pandemic. With valuable data often stored on student laptops/desktops and institutional servers, the challenges of monitoring personal device access – and backing up that data – has led to complications for departments. computers.

Unfortunately, this is a trend that will only continue, especially with the entry into force of new hybrid work platforms. With cybercriminals looking to take advantage of these vulnerabilities, educational institutions will need to improve their security posture to defend against this larger attack surface in 2022.

Scams to watch out for

One of the biggest threats facing the education sector is Business Email Compromise (BEC) scams.. These attacks involve scamming unsuspecting users for money when a malicious actor sends carefully targeted spear-phishing emails from what appears to be someone they trust. According to research in the United States, from the K-12 Cybersecurity Resource Center and the K12 Security Information Exchange, schools and colleges are more than twice as likely to be affected by a BEC scam as companies outside the education sector.

Likewise, ransomware, as well as BEC attacks, remain a threat to educational institutions. Schools are particularly vulnerable to ransomware due to security vulnerabilities and because attackers can target particularly sensitive times for educational institutions, such as during exams or registration periods.

The NCSC and other security groups continue to issue alerts about the recent wave of ransomware attacks in the industry, which unfortunately echo similar warnings from the past – the cost of ransom is high. The average ransom demanded is over £120,000 ($170,000). According to our research, the real price of ransomware is much higher. This figure does not include damage to operations, reputation, insurance or the cost of defensive measures.

For hackers, schools are valuable because of the data they can provide beyond student grades, including confidential student and staff information, staff and organization bank account details, and other personally identifiable information – making educational institutions the third most common target for hackers behind healthcare and financial services. Personal data is easily exchanged and visible on dark web marketplaces. Therefore, data loss due to theft is a common phenomenon in schools and in many cases it unfortunately goes undetected until it is too late.

The Challenges of Protecting Education from Cybercriminals

Since so much of the learning takes place online, severe attacks can interrupt the learning process for students. In March 2021, many schools in Nottinghamshire district had to shut down their IT infrastructures due to a sophisticated cyberattack.

This further emphasizes that it It is not uncommon for school administrators or teachers to make technology purchases without the consent or even knowledge of the school’s technology department. In these cases, equipment and software are purchased without consideration of potential cybersecurity risks. A single college or school campus can contain many different sub-organizations, such as offices or departments, which can increase a school’s vulnerability to attack.

Attackers frequently target an organization’s networks through remote access systems, such as Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) and Virtual Private Networks (VPN). The use of insecure RDP has grown exponentially as more administrators work remotely.

Cybersecurity Tips for Institutions to Stay Secure in the Year Ahead

BEC scams often attack schools and colleges by raping or posing as senior executives. Therefore, it is crucial to train staff to defend against phishing attacks and the compromise of work emails. Any process for releasing funds or sensitive data must have several safeguards in place.

IT administrators and service providers are responsible for providing sound procedures, training, monitoring and compliance. In the most challenging BYOD (bring your own device) environments, the first step should be to monitor and observe work practices before security guidelines are set, including asking questions such as:

  • Which video communication tool to use for distance education?
  • Which file extensions should be allowed?
  • Can files only be sent via email (which probably has file scanning) or a mobile chat app?

It is important to implement a cyber resilience strategy that prescribes multi-layered defenses. This should offer strong layered protection with AV, firewall, email filtering, intrusion detection, and DNS protection, as well as mandating two-factor authentication (2FA) where possible.

One of the most important strategies is to maintain multiple backups of critical institutional data. Cyber ​​criminals cannot be trusted to restore access to data even after ransom payment, so take care of this crucial requirement for recovery. The day a breach occurs is not the time to find out if your disaster recovery plan was well designed. Instead, simulate a worst-case scenario in advance and see if any gaps appear. Closing these gaps as soon as possible is a concrete step that educational institutions can take to protect themselves and their users.

Raising awareness and understanding threat exposure can help address many cybersecurity challenges – investing in security training for everyone is important. Emerging cybersecurity technologies, mitigation tools and strategies can help limit the trend of ransomware and BEC attacks exploding in educational institutions and strengthen cybersecurity throughout the coming year .

Matt Aldridge, Senior Solutions Consultant, Carbonite + web root

Recommend0 recommendationsPosted in Exclusive to FE News, Education, EdTech

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Netherlands: The Netherlands will help boost the state’s higher education sector | Thiruvananthapuram News https://the-education-store.com/netherlands-the-netherlands-will-help-boost-the-states-higher-education-sector-thiruvananthapuram-news/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 22:30:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/netherlands-the-netherlands-will-help-boost-the-states-higher-education-sector-thiruvananthapuram-news/ Thiruvananthapuram: The Netherlands will support the state’s efforts in creating centers of excellence in the higher education sector, Dutch Ambassador to India Marten Van den Berg has assured Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan when meeting with him on Tuesday.The ambassador agreed to the CM’s request to bring more Dutch investment to the state. The Chief Minister […]]]>
Thiruvananthapuram: The Netherlands will support the state’s efforts in creating centers of excellence in the higher education sector, Dutch Ambassador to India Marten Van den Berg has assured Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan when meeting with him on Tuesday.
The ambassador agreed to the CM’s request to bring more Dutch investment to the state. The Chief Minister has also invited tourists from the Netherlands to the state. Chief Minister says suggestions and help from the Netherlands after the 2018 floods have been of great help to the state, and the concept of “place for the river” has helped the state to make great strides in its efforts to control the flood. situation in Kuttanad.
The state has already launched a center of excellence at Ambalavayal in Wayanad with the cooperation of the Netherlands, to develop modern value-added technologies in fruit growing and floriculture. The Netherlands also offered state assistance in agriculture, water resources, technical education and climate change, during talks with the chief minister on Tuesday.
On Monday, the Dutch team held discussions with representatives from various state government departments to explore areas in which the state and the Netherlands can cooperate.
The meeting discussed the progress of cooperation in various sectors, with particular emphasis on disaster management and water resources management. A state proposal for a center of excellence in animal husbandry and collaboration on agriculture below sea level was also explored.
Cooperation with the National Archives of the Netherlands, state support in museums and a discussion of Cosmos Malabaricus, collaboration in football and hockey and cooperation in other areas such as renewable energies and initiatives start-ups were also on the agenda for Monday’s meeting. .
The cooperation between Kerala and the Netherlands started after the 2018 floods. The Chief Minister and a team of officials had visited the country to learn more about water resource management, as the Dutch are considered pioneers in flood control by managing their water resources.
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Education and health personnel launch new challenge to vax mandates https://the-education-store.com/education-and-health-personnel-launch-new-challenge-to-vax-mandates/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 04:21:19 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/education-and-health-personnel-launch-new-challenge-to-vax-mandates/ A legal challenge questioning the legality of the government’s Covid-19 vaccination mandate for educators and health workers has started in Wellington’s High Court, as a new group of anti-mandate protesters gather in the capital to support the challenge. The judicial review, brought to court by New Zealand Teachers Talking to Science (NZTSOS) and an Affiliated […]]]>

A legal challenge questioning the legality of the government’s Covid-19 vaccination mandate for educators and health workers has started in Wellington’s High Court, as a new group of anti-mandate protesters gather in the capital to support the challenge.

The judicial review, brought to court by New Zealand Teachers Talking to Science (NZTSOS) and an Affiliated Doctors Group (NZDSOS), is asking High Court Judge Francis Cooke to set aside the vaccination order, saying that the warrant violates the Bill of Rights Act.

The group says the vaccination mandate is not a “clearly justified” violation of the Bill of Rights, namely the right to refuse medical treatment.

The High Court challenge also questions the usefulness of vaccination warrants in an Omicron environment, highlighting comments from some medical professionals suggesting the extreme transmissibility of the variant renders warrants unnecessary.

The challenge to the vaccination order is the second brought to the High Court by the two groups – the first having been dismissed by High Court judge Matthew Palmer in November.

In support of this new challenge is a portfolio of 81 affidavits filed by teachers and health workers across the country – a number of whom lost their jobs after refusing to be vaccinated.

This week’s challenge is similar to one issued by a group of police and defense force employees, also before Judge Cooke. This group succeeded last week in asserting that the mandate affecting this sector was an unwarranted incursion into the Bill of Rights.

Police and the NZDF have since suspended all dismissals of unvaccinated staff following the ruling.

According to December figures, 1,461 employees in the 20 district health boards were affected by the mandates. Some of these employees chose to resign, while 814 had their jobs terminated.

But the number of employees affected in the education sector is unclear, with school boards themselves holding information on affected staff, rather than the Department of Education.

Not all schools responded to a ministry survey which attempted to paint a more detailed picture of the scale of staff affected.

Acting for the plaintiffs, barrister Warren Pyke read in court a number of affidavits from relevant education and health personnel, including GPs, occupational therapists and early childhood teachers, detailing the effect of mandates.

A number of those who filed affidavits made it clear they would be comfortable being tested daily if it meant they could return to work.

Others have detailed the effect the mandate has had on patients – particularly those who have lost their GP to redundancies.

“People are going to lose their family doctor, people are going to lose their GP. Continuity of care may be compromised,” a concerned employee told the court.

Another affidavit detailed allegations of multiple reactions to the first dose of vaccine, leading the person to make the decision not to receive a second dose.

Pyke also told the court that the concept of vaccination mandates was best summed up by Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern herself, when she agreed in an interview with the Herald that the mandates created two classes of people.

“That, as far as the Honorable Prime Minister is concerned, is an accurate observation. That is what he is.”

While Thursday’s hearing mainly heard from lawyers acting for the claimants, representatives of Covid-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins are expected to appear in court tomorrow.

A large group of protesters gathered outside Wellington Station on Thursday morning, in support of the challenge.

With the High Court located across the road from Parliament, the continued closure of Molesworth St meant protesters could not congregate directly outside the court.

In a statement to Open Justice, a spokesperson for NZTSOS said protests were planned over the next five days but assured the public they would be peaceful, unlike the violent clash between police and protesters seen on Wednesday. .

The challenge is expected to end on Monday.

Ethan Griffiths

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ASUU strike: FG urged to convene emergency meeting of education sector stakeholders now https://the-education-store.com/asuu-strike-fg-urged-to-convene-emergency-meeting-of-education-sector-stakeholders-now/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 18:17:45 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/asuu-strike-fg-urged-to-convene-emergency-meeting-of-education-sector-stakeholders-now/ As the warning strike launched by members of the Academic Staff Union of Universities (ASUU) continues, the need to convene an emergency meeting of stakeholders in the education sector has been stressed. The reason for convening the meeting is to propose a lasting solution to the myriad of challenges that militate against the smooth functioning […]]]>

As the warning strike launched by members of the Academic Staff Union of Universities (ASUU) continues, the need to convene an emergency meeting of stakeholders in the education sector has been stressed.

The reason for convening the meeting is to propose a lasting solution to the myriad of challenges that militate against the smooth functioning of the country’s education sector, particularly the persistent strike actions that have held back higher education institutions. .

In the same vein, members of the Academic Staff Union of Universities (ASUU) have been called upon to listen to the government for the general benefit of Nigerian students.

The call was made by the National Association of Nigerian Students (NANS) during a press conference held on Sunday at the Secretariat of the Student Union (SUG) Government of Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University (ATBU), in Bauchi.

NANS National Director of Administration and Strategy, Prince Mohammed Sani Hassan, speaking to reporters, lamented that “the university strike in Nigeria is becoming a norm with successive governments, including the current administration of President Muhammadu Buhari, which has failed to respond to demands and the 2008 Agreement signed by the Federal Government and ASUU.

He added that “this strike has continued to hurt more, the students and their parents who have worked very hard and ultimately have little in their pockets to support their respective children in Nigerian universities.”

Mohammed added that “it is in light of the above that the ASUU strike appears to be a festival in Nigeria that happens every year, leaving the consequences directly on the students.”

IN CASE YOU MISSED THESE FROM NIGERIAN TRIBUNE

According to him, “It is an incontrovertible discussion that a four-year course now takes no less than 7-8 years for a Nigerian student who is struggling tooth and nail to survive in the current economic realities.”

“We therefore deem it appropriate and necessary, as stakeholders in this struggle, to speak to you about these continuing clashes between members of the Universities Academic Staff Union and the Federal Government to end this long-running feud that is alienating Nigerian students. of their classrooms. “, he underlined.

He said that “the federal government, through the Federal Ministry of Education under the competent supervision of Mallam Adamu Adamu and the Minister of Labor, Chris Ngige, should guarantee the respect of the agreement adopted previously”.

“Government and ASUU are stakeholders and at the same time team players in this game which has made this government its reputation in the education sector after being pro-ASUU in the past,” said he added.

The NANS director said that “we have not yet emerged from the negative effects of the similar action last year, as this strike is never expected to end anytime soon. We all saw what happened last year when this type of strike happened and the federal government and ASUU ended it at a roundtable.

He pointed out that “this strike has continued to greatly affect the chances of the less privileged to reach the top of their careers because all the students currently at home are those of the underdogs”.

Mohammed said that “ASUU leadership needs to call its members to order and let them know that there is an increasing number of graduates sitting at home and given the scarcely available job opportunities, this should serve as a warning signal to university professors”.

“The government must know that education is a right of every Nigerian child, so it must be a priority to secure the future of the nation amid growing insecurity,” he said.

According to him, “Illiteracy and increasing unemployment have been identified as the main factors that continue to traumatize Nigerians, then it becomes more necessary for the government to create millions of investments in the education sector and to ensure wealth creation through empowerment programs”.

Sani Mohammed concluded that “As stakeholders, we will continue to be team players in creating the best platform for peace and unity to struggle in the country through our position to ensure that justice for Nigerian students cannot be compromised”.

He said “the sad reality is that many are losing out to serve their country through the compulsory national youth service program because of these persistent strikes which are about to cripple our education system.”

He went on to appreciate the efforts of Bauchi State Governor Sen Bala A Mohammed and security agencies for their efforts to secure peace in Bauchi State.

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EdCIL Hosts “Study in India” Diplomatic Conclave to Showcase India’s Education Sector | India News https://the-education-store.com/edcil-hosts-study-in-india-diplomatic-conclave-to-showcase-indias-education-sector-india-news/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 07:24:24 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/edcil-hosts-study-in-india-diplomatic-conclave-to-showcase-indias-education-sector-india-news/ New Delhi: As part of Azadi Ka Amrit Mahotsava, India’s 75th Independence Day celebrations, EdCIL organized the “Study in India” Diplomatic Conclave to showcase India’s education sector, especially the policies and programs aimed at providing educational opportunities to foreign students in India. The event was held at Sushma Swaraj Bhawan in New Delhi on Thursday, […]]]>

New Delhi: As part of Azadi Ka Amrit Mahotsava, India’s 75th Independence Day celebrations, EdCIL organized the “Study in India” Diplomatic Conclave to showcase India’s education sector, especially the policies and programs aimed at providing educational opportunities to foreign students in India.

The event was held at Sushma Swaraj Bhawan in New Delhi on Thursday, February 24 with the participation of diplomats from 20 countries around the world.

Union Minister of State for External Affairs and Education Rajkumar Ranjan Singh presided over the opening ceremony attended by Saurabh Kumar – Secretary (East), Anil Kumar Rai – Deputy Secretary (Coord and Parliament ) and senior officials of EdCIL (India) Limited.

In its opening remarks, the MoS highlighted the opportunities offered to international students under the Government of India’s “Study in India” scheme to enhance partnership between countries in the education sector.

Singh said the Conclave is organized to showcase India’s association with friendly foreign countries through exchanges and educational ties.

The objective of the ‘Study in India Diplomatic Conclave’ was to promote the sharing of best academic and research practices through interactions between various education systems through foreign dignitaries who also helped to understand the systems of higher education in various international markets.

The admission process for “Study in India” is entirely online where a student has to go to the website (www.studyinindia.gov.in), register, login, fill in student information, choose fee waived courses in the best institute of your choice and submit the application. After the mock and final consultation rounds, your chosen colleges will respond to you with the award letter. The whole process is free.

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Big Data Education Sector in India is expected to reach US$928.55 million by 2026 https://the-education-store.com/big-data-education-sector-in-india-is-expected-to-reach-us928-55-million-by-2026/ Sun, 20 Feb 2022 13:43:26 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/big-data-education-sector-in-india-is-expected-to-reach-us928-55-million-by-2026/ Big Data Education Sector in India is expected to reach US$928.55 million by 2026 by Analytics Insight February 20, 2022 The popularity of big data and data science education has skyrocketed over the past few years, let’s see why Big data in education can help universities and colleges transform their business models, student academic outcomes, […]]]>

Big Data Education Sector in India is expected to reach US$928.55 million by 2026


by Analytics Insight
February 20, 2022

The popularity of big data and data science education has skyrocketed over the past few years, let’s see why

Big data in education can help universities and colleges transform their business models, student academic outcomes, and faculty effectiveness. Additionally, insights from Big Data can help educational institutions improve their technology systems. Professionals with knowledge of data science and analytics are key players in transforming the field of education. Those interested in helping universities and colleges understand the value of data and analytics can benefit from various degrees.

The article offers a detailed analysis of how the data science education sector in India is shaping the country. It also gives authoritative information on the market, its size, forecasts, top institutes, top recruiting companies, top job roles and profiles along with salaries, different platforms, etc. Of the industry.

The popularity of data science education has exploded in recent years. Subsequently, job prospects in the field have also increased as companies around the world seek to hire skilled professionals to drive business processes.

Universities rely on different technology systems to manage various aspects of their organization. This can result in siled systems that do not communicate with each other. Data science offers academic institutions the ability to integrate critical systems, applications, and platforms. This in turn allows them to create efficiencies and reduce costs.

This article concludes that the market size of Data Science Education industry in India is projected to grow from US$143.48 million in 2021 to US$928.55 million in 2026, with a CAGR of 57.52 %.

Data science is growing in popularity and it’s easy to see why. A skilled data science graduate who can interpret and extract meaning from data has become more important as data becomes more valuable to businesses around the world. Both statistics and computer science are components of data science, so it’s a great choice for those with an analytical mind, a love of computing, and a fascination with numbers.

The article also analyzed online and offline educational training platforms. On-campus education is estimated to grow at a CAGR of 56.73% to reach US$572.28 million in 2026. Similarly, the online education market will grow from US$52.81 million in 2021 to US$356.27 million in 2026, with a CAGR of 58.82%.

Even though the education sector is constantly producing huge amounts of information, the use of big data analytics has yet to gain traction compared to areas such as media, health, digital marketing, etc There is a thriving eagerness in the big data education sector in India to derive value that can be applied for the overall advancement of the economy.

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Analytics Insight is an influential platform dedicated to ideas, trends and opinions from the world of data-driven technologies. It monitors the developments, recognition and achievements of artificial intelligence, big data and analytics companies across the world.

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Lawan meets with education regulators over alleged tuition hike https://the-education-store.com/lawan-meets-with-education-regulators-over-alleged-tuition-hike/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 18:52:03 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/lawan-meets-with-education-regulators-over-alleged-tuition-hike/ Senate Speaker Ahmad Lawan on Tuesday held a meeting with heads of education sector regulatory agencies to ease simmering tension over an alleged tuition hike in some educational institutions superior. Attending the meeting were the Executive Secretary of the National University Commission (NUC), Prof. Abubakar Rasheed, the Executive Secretary of the National Commission for Colleges […]]]>

Senate Speaker Ahmad Lawan on Tuesday held a meeting with heads of education sector regulatory agencies to ease simmering tension over an alleged tuition hike in some educational institutions superior.

Attending the meeting were the Executive Secretary of the National University Commission (NUC), Prof. Abubakar Rasheed, the Executive Secretary of the National Commission for Colleges of Education (NCCE), Prof. Paulinus Chijoke Okwelle and Hajia Bilkisu Salihijo Ahmad representing the National Council for Technical Education (NBTE).

The Senate Speaker told his guests that he called the meeting as a follow-up to an earlier engagement he had last week with the Coalition of Northern Groups – Student Wing, which had filed a complaint about a plan by some higher education institutions to raise tuition fees. .

“We felt that we actually had a duty to listen to our students and of course also to hear from you because we have to establish beyond reasonable doubt what the situation is,” Lawan said.

The President of the Senate warned that “whatever the situations we find ourselves in, we must not do anything that could jeopardize the position of our students, especially at such a difficult time.

“We understand that our higher education institutions need more resources, but we also understand that our students are mostly from very poor backgrounds and we need to do everything we can to protect those who are so vulnerable.

“Funding for their education should never stand between them and achieving their dreams. So we need to find out how this situation is and we take appropriate action.

“Because you represent the oversight bodies of our higher education institutions, we felt that we should start with you, listen to you and then we can now find a way out of this.”

He assured the students that the National Assembly and even the government would always work to protect and support them in pursuing their studies.

Responding on behalf of his other colleagues, NUC Executive Secretary Prof. Rasheed commended the Senate Speaker for his timely intervention.

“Your concern is shared by all of us. It will be, at this stage, difficult to know exactly which universities are infringing and which are not. But after this meeting, we will consult all the Universities with a template to fill in and we will say exactly what charges they have.

“We will advertise. If we are misled, we can come to know. We understand that universities cannot be forced to charge uniform fees across the country because they have different demands and come from different situations.

“It is possible that a university in Lagos or Port Harcourt will charge a little more than universities in some rural areas. But there should be a base.

“One university cannot charge N20,000 while the other charges Nigerian students N150,000 where tuition has been free since 1978 at the undergraduate level.

“We are glad that you have now given this alarm in time and I will come back immediately, consult with the Vice-Chancellors and if possible we will bring them to a meeting to discuss the resolution we will arrive at, at the end of this meeting” , said the professor. said Rashid.

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Need to reintegrate children into the system: Abhijeet Banerjee https://the-education-store.com/need-to-reintegrate-children-into-the-system-abhijeet-banerjee/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 11:35:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/need-to-reintegrate-children-into-the-system-abhijeet-banerjee/ According to Nobel Laureate Abhijeet Banerjee, learning losses from school closures are one of the biggest global threats to long-term recovery from COVID-19 and the economic cost will be severe if remedial measures are not taken. are not taken urgently. Noting that temporary school closures will cause permanent damage, he said simply […]]]>

According to Nobel Laureate Abhijeet Banerjee, learning losses from school closures are one of the biggest global threats to long-term recovery from COVID-19 and the economic cost will be severe if remedial measures are not taken. are not taken urgently.

Noting that temporary school closures will cause permanent damage, he said simply reopening schools would not be enough and that failing to measure learning losses and take steps to reintegrate children into the system would be a “recipe for a disaster”.



The renowned economist is co-chair of the Global Education Evidence Advisory Group (GEEAP), which is working on recommendations for the education sector in the post-pandemic world. He won the 2019 Nobel Prize in Economics.

“The short- and long-term impact of the COVID-19 crisis on the education, well-being and future productivity of children is profound. Nearly two years after school closures began in most of countries around the world, governments must take urgent action to limit the Estimates suggest that the economic cost of lost learning from the crisis will run into the trillions of US dollars if corrective action is not taken urgently Banerjee told PTI in a phone interview from Massachusetts in the United States.

“While many other sectors rebounded as lockdowns eased, the damage to children’s education is likely to reduce children’s well-being and productivity for decades, causing disruption to education and learning losses due to school closures, one of the biggest threats to mid- to long-term recovery from COVID-19 unless governments act quickly,” he added.

Banerjee, who is currently a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), said schools should reopen at the earliest opportunity.

“Schools need to reopen and stay open as much as possible, but that will not be enough. It is very important to tackle the problem of dropouts to ensure that they return to school and have a plan to reintegrate children in the school system.

“Failing to measure learning loss and acting on the results will be an absolute recipe for disaster. We must recognize that children will definitely fall behind and urgent action must be taken to close the gap and minimize learning loss. income,” he said.

Launched in July 2020, GEEAP is an independent interdisciplinary body composed of leading education experts from around the world. Its mandate is to provide succinct, actionable, and policy-oriented recommendations to support decision-making by policy makers on investments in education in low- and middle-income countries.

“The third factor that countries urgently need to work on is teacher training. Teachers already had a difficult job and with learning losses, children falling behind and varying levels of learning in the classroom, it is harder for teachers to help most students catch up. Providing teachers with simple teaching guides combined with strong tracking and feedback systems can help them structure their teaching approach and ensure that children learn additional tutoring can also help children catch up,” Banerjee said.

“In addition to requiring urgent recovery efforts, the pandemic presents a rare opportunity to rethink and reset education provision so that children of all identities, socio-economic backgrounds and circumstances can learn and thrive,” he added.

Banerjee also warned against closing schools unless there is an aggressive variant of COVID-19 that puts children at extremely high risk.

“Even in the event of new outbreaks, schools should be the last institution to close and the first to reopen, given the relatively low risk of transmission and high cost to young people. If there is an aggressive variant of COVID-19 which puts children at extremely high risk, of course no one wants children to die. But if that’s not the case, I think we should avoid closing schools any further,” he said. .

Schools around the world closed in 2020 following the novel coronavirus outbreak and reopened in various countries depending on the Covid situation. At the height of the crisis, UNESCO data showed that more than 1.6 billion learners in more than 190 countries were out of school. More than 100 million teachers and school staff have been affected by the sudden closures of educational institutions.

(Only the title and image of this report may have been edited by Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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