Education system – The Education Store http://the-education-store.com/ Sat, 01 Oct 2022 06:45:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://the-education-store.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png Education system – The Education Store http://the-education-store.com/ 32 32 How Singapore’s Education System Is Better Than Pakistan’s https://the-education-store.com/how-singapores-education-system-is-better-than-pakistans/ Sat, 01 Oct 2022 06:45:34 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/how-singapores-education-system-is-better-than-pakistans/ Singapore produces one of the most competitive PISA OECD students and also ranked number 1 a few times and once position in the top 10 almost every time, so what does Singapore’s education system offer its students that makes them so good? Certainly, student interests and hard work play the biggest role in it, but […]]]>

Singapore produces one of the most competitive PISA OECD students and also ranked number 1 a few times and once position in the top 10 almost every time, so what does Singapore’s education system offer its students that makes them so good? Certainly, student interests and hard work play the biggest role in it, but children all over the world have almost the same abilities, for example, you can’t say that Pakistani children are stupid, that’s why they don’t win anything and never got a stop up. 20 OECD PISA Rankings. So there is something else that Singapore does to perform so well and that is its school system.

Singapore has removed the competitive part of education and made every student’s learning a priority. Primary and secondary school records will no longer indicate whether a student finishes first or last in the class, while the averages by subject and by group, the overall total marks and the minimum and maximum marks are set to disappear.

Report cards will not display underlined or overlined failing grades or record a pass or fail result at the end of the year. Discussions, assignments, and quizzes should replace grades and grades as the preferred method of collecting information about the performance of young primary school students.

While older primary and secondary students will also study in a less competitive environment. Grades for each subject will be rounded to the nearest whole number without decimal places to reduce the emphasis on academic achievement. Ong Ye Kung, Minister of Education of Singapore, supported these measures as; “Learning is not a competition” when these changes were made in 2019.

The Department of Education (MOE) is planning a series of changes aimed at discouraging comparisons between student performance and encouraging individuals to focus on their own learning development. Singapore’s new approach to education stands in stark contrast to neighboring states that top the OECD’s Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) education rankings. This confirms that it’s not all about competition.

The system in Singapore presents very different paths and directions and overall gives students a better chance to discover and excel in their fields of interest, so professionals in the fields would be passionate and put all their heart.

In Pakistan, children’s careers are often chosen by their overwhelmed parents or students often choose their own careers because they haven’t received enough career guidance. Students don’t have enough space outside of learning and memorizing things and trying to beat their own friends in class to actually find out what they love and make a career out of it. Parents, on the other hand, instead of encouraging children to try different things, urge their children to always perform better in class so that they don’t have to face public shame.

Good teachers are also a very important aspect of the education system while only those who cannot get a high paying job in their field opt for a teaching career in Pakistan. In Singapore, the NIE, the entity created to prepare teachers, principals, and superintendents for their school system, has established a rigorous process for the selection and training of educators. Only one candidate out of twelve who applies to become a teacher becomes one.

The most common path is to first earn a bachelor’s degree from a recognized university. To qualify, the college graduate must have graduated in the top third of their class. Candidates who wish to teach in a secondary school must be specialized in the subject they wish to teach. Candidates for primary education must have a degree in English, mathematics or a foreign language.

Candidates who meet the above criteria are then called for an interview. The four-educator interview panel discusses why applicants want to become teachers, their teaching skills, communication skills, and personal demeanor. An integral part of the interview is a series of role-playing and essay writing regarding how the candidate would approach specific situations in the classroom. 80% of students surveyed are rejected!

Candidates who pass the interview are then hired by the MOE and assigned to a class and a mentor for three to six months. In other words, Singapore pays qualified candidates to become teachers. Forty percent of those selected to receive the classroom experience fail to meet the standards and are removed from the program.

The remaining candidates are then required to complete a 16-month course program at the NIE, obtaining a postgraduate degree in education. Candidates earn between $3,600 and $5,000 per month while participating in the program. Very few students fail or leave the program once selected. Upon completion of the NIE courses, candidates are assigned to the same school where they are taught and begin their teaching career. In this way, only the most qualified educators and experts in their fields are given the responsibility to teach young people and the products of these incredible mentors are also excellent.

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PhD Candidate in Electric Power System Adaptation for Large Scale Hydrogen Production in Norway at NORWEGIAN UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY – NTNU https://the-education-store.com/phd-candidate-in-electric-power-system-adaptation-for-large-scale-hydrogen-production-in-norway-at-norwegian-university-of-science-technology-ntnu/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 02:58:04 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/phd-candidate-in-electric-power-system-adaptation-for-large-scale-hydrogen-production-in-norway-at-norwegian-university-of-science-technology-ntnu/ About the job For a doctoral position, the objective is a complete doctoral training until obtaining a doctorate. The PhD student is part of “Sustainability and Integrated Assessment” in the FME HYDROGENi and will also collaborate closely with PhD students and related researchers in other parts of the center, and in particular within “Green H2 […]]]>

About the job

For a doctoral position, the objective is a complete doctoral training until obtaining a doctorate. The PhD student is part of “Sustainability and Integrated Assessment” in the FME HYDROGENi and will also collaborate closely with PhD students and related researchers in other parts of the center, and in particular within “Green H2 Production”. Hydrogen demand and energy system scenarios will align with findings from, for example, “Hydrogen Pathways 2050”. The Ph.D. builds on more than 20 years of experience in the field of renewable hydrogen systems at the Department of Electrical Engineering (IEL), NTNU.

The main supervisor of the doctoral student will be the associate professor. Steve Vollerand the co-supervisors will be the teacher Magnus Korpas and teacher Irina Oleinikova. In addition, cooperating partner co-supervisors may be appointed.

The position reports to the Head of Department.

Job duties

Recent decarbonization scenarios show extensive use of hydrogen in industry, transportation and energy systems around 2050, which will lead to increased pressure on the power system, as hydrogen production is an energy-intensive process. This PhD will address the energy system challenges expected as hydrogen generation comes online in the Nordic power system around 2050. Needs for new renewable energy generation and grids to support different generation scenarios Distributed and centralized hydrogen power plants are of particular importance. In addition, the doctoral student will assess the capacity of electrolysis plants to provide flexibility to the electrical system, and thus to add value to the hydrogen production and use chain.

The results of the thesis should be of great importance for energy companies and hydrogen producers, to better understand how hydrogen production can be integrated into the power system in a technically sound and economically feasible way.

Selection criteria required

  • You should have a master’s degree in electrical power engineering or physics with a specialization relevant to the given area of ​​research.
  • You must have a strong academic background from your previous studies and an average grade from the Master’s program, or an equivalent background, equal to or better than B on the NTNU grading scale.
  • You must meet the conditions for admission to the doctoral program of the Faculty (https://www.ntnu.edu/studies/phelkt)
  • Good written and oral English skills. Applicants from non-English speaking countries outside the EU/EEA/Switzerland must provide preliminary documentation of English proficiency, in the form of an approved test. The following tests can be used: TOEFL, IELTS and Cambridge Certificate in Advanced English (CAE) or Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE).

The appointment is to be made in accordance with Regulations concerning the degrees of Philosophiae Doctor (PhD) and Philosodophiae Doctor (PhD) in artistic research national guidelines for the appointment as PhD, post doctor and research assistant

Preferred Selection Criteria

  • Relevant work experience in hydrogen systems, energy modelling, holistic energy systems or similar is an advantage.
  • Relevant (non-)scientific publications, for example in popular science, showing the ability to communicate fluently.
  • Written and oral skills in Norwegian are an advantage. If you are not from a Scandinavian country, you can provide documentation of your skills (eg Norskprøven, Bergenstest).

Personal characteristics

  • Curious and motivated
  • Creativity and innovation in research
  • scientific mind
  • Ability to work in all traditional disciplines and easily connect with other researchers

Emphasis will be placed on personal and interpersonal qualities.

We offer

Salary and conditions

As a doctoral student (code 1017) you are normally paid from NOK 501,200 per year before tax, depending on qualifications and seniority. From the salary, 2% is deducted as a contribution to the Norwegian civil service pension fund.

The employment contract is for three years; however, there is a possibility of extension for up to four years if selected for assistantship.

Appointment to a doctoral position requires you to be admitted to the doctoral program in Electrical Power Engineering within three months of your employment and that you are participating in an organized doctoral program during the period of employment.

The commitment must be made in accordance with the regulations in force concerning State Employees and Officials, and acts relating to the control of the export of strategic goods, services and technologies. Applicants who, after evaluation of the application and attachment, are found to conflict with the criteria of the latter Act will be barred from recruitment at NTNU. After the appointment, you should assume that there may be changes in the working area.

It is a prerequisite to be present and accessible to the institution on a daily basis.

About the application

The application and the supporting documents to be used as the basis for the assessment must be in English or Norwegian.

Publications and other scientific work must follow the application. Please note that your application will be considered solely on the basis of the information submitted by the application deadline. You should therefore ensure that your application clearly demonstrates how your skills and experience meet the criteria specified above.

The request must include:

  • A cover letter in which the candidate describes his personal motivation and his relevance to the requirements of this announcement.
  • A draft research proposal (1-2 pages) for the doctoral study, where you present your own ideas for the doctoral work and how it can be applied, based on the project description given in this advertisement. This proposal will not be final or binding for the project.
  • CV and certificates including information related to given qualifications.
  • Bachelor’s and master’s transcripts and diplomas. If you have not completed the master’s degree, you must submit confirmation that the master’s thesis has been submitted and add contact details for your supervisor.
  • A copy of the master’s thesis. If you have recently submitted your master’s thesis, you can attach a thesis project. Documentation of a completed master’s degree must be presented prior to taking up the position.
  • Testimonials and certificates. Applicants from universities outside Norway are requested to send a diploma supplement (https://ec.europa.eu/education/diploma-supplement_en) or similar document, which describes in detail the study program and the rating system.
  • Name and contact details of three references.
  • Other relevant publications or research.

If all or part of your training was taken abroad, we also ask you to attach documentation on the extent and quality of all of your training, both bachelor’s and master’s, in addition to other graduate studies. The description of the required documentation can be found here. If you already have a statement from NOKUT, please attach it as well.

We will consider working together. If it is difficult to identify your efforts in joint work, you should attach a brief description of your involvement.

In evaluating the most qualified candidate, emphasis will be placed on education, experience, and personal and interpersonal qualities. Motivation, ambitions and potential will also count in the evaluation of candidates.

NTNU is committed to following the research quality assessment criteria according to The San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment – DORA.

general informations

Working at NTNU

NTNU believes that inclusion and diversity are our strength. We want to recruit people with different skills, backgrounds, life experiences and perspectives to help solve our social responsibilities in education and research. We will facilitate the needs of our employees.

NTNU is actively working to increase the number of women employed in scientific positions and has a number of resources to promote equality.

The city of Trondheim is a modern European city with a rich cultural scene. Trondheim is Norway’s innovation capital with a population of 200,000. The Norwegian welfare state, including health care, schools, kindergartens and general equality, is probably the best of its kind in the world. Subsidized professional day care for children is easily accessible. Additionally, Trondheim offers great education opportunities (including international schools) and opportunities to enjoy nature, culture and family life and has a low crime rate and clean air. own.

As an employee of NTNU, you must at all times adhere to the changes that the development of the subject implies and the organizational changes that are adopted.

A public list of candidates with name, age, job title and municipality of residence is prepared after the application deadline. If you wish to reserve an inscription on the public list of candidates, this must be justified. The evaluation will be done in accordance with Current legislation. You will be notified if the reservation is not accepted.

If you have any questions about the position, please contact Associate Professor Steve Voller, phone +47/73558933, email steve.voller@ntnu.no. If you have any questions about the recruitment process, please contact Bodil Vuttudal Wold, email: bodil.wold@ntnu.no

If you think this sounds interesting and matches your qualifications, please submit your application electronically via jobbnorge.no with your CV, diplomas and certificates attached. Applications submitted elsewhere will not be considered. Upon request, you must be able to obtain certified copies of your documentation.

Application deadline: November 1, 2022.

NTNU – knowledge for a better world

The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) creates knowledge for a better world and solutions that can change everyday life.

Electrical Engineering Department

The Department of Electrical Engineering is one of the seven departments of the Faculty of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering. Our department is the Norwegian leader in this field, and our vision is to be at the center of the digital and green transition. We have excellent collaboration with business and industry as well as with other universities and research organizations internationally. This gives us exceptional opportunities for interdisciplinary research with high relevance to society, responding to industrial needs and global challenges.

Deadline November 1, 2022

Employer NTNU – Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Municipality Trondheim

Scope Full time

Duration Temporary

place of service NTNU Gloshaugen Campus

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ESM Adds Security, New Weapon Detectors After Racist Shooting Threat; the school will reopen on Tuesday https://the-education-store.com/esm-adds-security-new-weapon-detectors-after-racist-shooting-threat-the-school-will-reopen-on-tuesday/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 19:51:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/esm-adds-security-new-weapon-detectors-after-racist-shooting-threat-the-school-will-reopen-on-tuesday/ East Syracuse, NY — Students at East Syracuse Minoa High School will return to class Tuesday with heightened security as the district and police continue to investigate a threat of racial violence, the superintendent said Monday. The high school switched to remote learning on Monday after a student received a text message saying “violence would […]]]>

East Syracuse, NY — Students at East Syracuse Minoa High School will return to class Tuesday with heightened security as the district and police continue to investigate a threat of racial violence, the superintendent said Monday.

The high school switched to remote learning on Monday after a student received a text message saying “violence would be happening at school on Monday.”

A student received the threat – which included “racist sentiments” – and posted it on social media, according to the superintendent.

A text message sent shortly after 1 a.m. Sunday to a student shared with Syracuse.com | The Post-Standard threatened a high school shooting Monday targeting black students.

Similar racist shooting threats were also sent to students at Corcoran and Henninger High Schools in the city of Syracuse, police said.

In Syracuse, threats claimed the shooting would take place at 12:30 p.m. Monday, but no shooting took place, city police spokesman Lt. Matthew Malinowski said. Additional police were present at high schools across the city on Monday, he said.

Manlius Police Sgt. Kenneth Hatter said the threatening text message to ESM was sent just hours after the high school homecoming dance, where several fights broke out, some verbal and some physical. It is unclear if the fights and threats are related, police said.

No weapons were used, found or mentioned during the dance, police said. Hatter declined to comment on the details of the threat.

On Monday, as ESM students learned remotely, school officials worked quickly to increase safety when students returned to class on Tuesday, Superintendent Donna DeSiato said in a letter to students and parents. .

The district installed a new weapons detection system, known as EVOLV, at the high school’s main entrance on Monday, she said.

From Tuesday, all ESM students and visitors must enter the school through the main entrance where they will be greeted with the new weapons detection system.

“The EVOLV weapons detection system is more effective than a traditional metal detector,” DeSiato said. “The EVOLV system is one of many tools the district uses to continue to build capacity for a safe learning environment for students.”

ESM school officials, with assistance from the Manlius Police Department, also added two officers, DeSiato said.

“The district’s highest priority continues to be the well-being and safety of our students and staff,” DeSiato said.

Here is the letter the ESM Superintendent sent to parents and families on Monday:

Dear ESM parents and guardians,

As we’ve shared, we’ll continue to keep you informed with new and updated information related to last weekend’s events.

Regarding the threat of racial violence, superintendents of neighboring districts reported that a similar threat of racial violence had been sent to three other high schools in the past 24 hours. Manlius City Police continue to investigate the racial threat of violence anonymously texted to an ESM student and posted on social media. We will let you know as soon as new information becomes available.

In response to the improper actions involving fights at the homecoming dance, investigations were completed and appropriate disciplinary action was taken. We simply will not tolerate these behaviors as the safety of all students and staff is paramount.

Over the past few weeks, we have researched various systems to increase the security of our high school. Today, a new weapons detection system known as EVOLV was installed at the main entrance, and new entry procedures will be in place from tomorrow. The main entrance will be the single point of entry for all students and visitors. The EVOLV weapon detection system is more effective than a traditional metal detector. The EVOLV system is one of many tools the district uses to continue to build capacity for a safe learning environment for students. This system will expand our capabilities and strengthen our preventive measures in partnership with local law enforcement. Mr. Avellino will send information regarding Single Point of Entry procedures for tomorrow, later today.

Additionally, this month the district expanded its partnership with the Manlius City Police with the addition of two special patrol officers. Officer Todd Galarneau is at ESM High School and Officer Percy Clarke is at Pine Grove Middle School. These officers are available to assist with safety and security at all of our elementary schools.

The District’s highest priority continues to be the well-being and safety of our students and staff. The ESM School Board and our entire management team will continue to take additional safety measures for the well-being of all. Thank you for your continued support.

More sincerely,

Dr. Donna DeSiato

Superintendent

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Manlius Police are asking anyone with information about the threat to contact them at (315) 682-8673 or tips@manliuspolice.org.

Do you have any advice or story ideas? Contact Catie O’Toole: cotoole@syracuse.com | text/call 315-470-2134 | Twitter | Facebook.

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Voucher system expansion for private schools stalled in Arizona https://the-education-store.com/voucher-system-expansion-for-private-schools-stalled-in-arizona/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 16:05:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/voucher-system-expansion-for-private-schools-stalled-in-arizona/ Public school advocates who oppose a massive expansion of Arizona’s private school voucher system enacted by the Republican-controlled legislature and signed into law by Republican Gov. Doug Ducey in July filed enough signatures on Friday to prevent it from taking effect. The law, which expands the program to all children in the state, will be […]]]>

Public school advocates who oppose a massive expansion of Arizona’s private school voucher system enacted by the Republican-controlled legislature and signed into law by Republican Gov. Doug Ducey in July filed enough signatures on Friday to prevent it from taking effect.

The law, which expands the program to all children in the state, will be suspended instead of taking effect on Saturday. If a review finds Save Our Schools Arizona has met the requirement of nearly 119,000 valid signatures — and if those signatures survive any legal challenges filed by the voucher lenders — it will remain blocked until the November 2024 election.

Beth Lewis, executive director of the core group formed when a similar expansion passed in 2017 and was successfully challenged at the polls, said Friday the group had garnered 141,714 signatures. That’s less than they’d hoped, since groups that try to push voter legislation or get initiatives on the ballot typically aim for at least a 25% cushion.

Voters rejected the previous expansion by a 2/3 majority in the 2018 election.

Lewis put some of the blame on Ducey, who kept the bill for 10 days after the Legislative Assembly adjourned, a move that cut the time opponents had to collect signatures from 90 to 80 days .

“We really wish we had those 10 days that Ducey stole from voters to build our cushion,” Lewis said. “But we have enough to be confident that with our signatures valid, we can hand over and get through the processing and get it on the ballot.”

Opponents of the vouchers say the program diverts money from the state’s public schools, which have been underfunded for decades and educate the vast majority of students in the state, although Ducey and the legislature have injected l money in the system over the past few years. Proponents of the voucher program say it allows parents to choose the best school for their children. Ducey is a major backer of ‘school choice’ and has touted the expansion at a bill signing ceremony in August.

Supporters of the expansion of the state voucher program, technically called Empowerment Scholarship Accounts, have organized to try to persuade voters not to sign the petitions. They showed up at signing events with “Refuse to Sign” signs and called businesses to tell them petition dispensers were in their parking lots.

Among those backing the expansion are national “school choice” groups like the American Federation for Children, founded and once led by Betsy DeVos, the Trump administration’s education secretary.

Scott Smith, a former Republican state senator who is now AFC state director, said he expects “every” effort to defeat voters’ referendum, whether in court or at the ballot box.

“Rest assured, whatever happens, I’m sure it’s safe to say myself and others and parents will do whatever we can to protect their rights to educate their children as they see best “Smith said.

Under the state constitution, voters can block most laws passed by the Legislative Assembly by collecting signatures. To allow for this, most new laws come into force 90 days after the legislature adjourns, which is the deadline for a remand.

Although about a third of Arizona students are eligible for the existing voucher program — primarily those who live in low-income areas — only about 12,000 students statewide currently use the system.

The expansion signed by Ducey will allow all parents in Arizona to take public money now sent to the K-12 public school system and use it to pay for their children’s tuition in private schools, the home school materials or other education costs.

Arizona already has the most extensive education options in the nation and will have the most comprehensive voucher system if the law goes into effect.

An estimated 60,000 currently enrolled private school students and about 38,000 home-schooled students would be immediately eligible for up to $7,000 a year, though a small number are already getting vouchers. The 1.1 million students who attend traditional district and charter schools would also qualify to leave their public schools and receive money to attend private schools.

Since the state Department of Education opened a new portal for parents to apply under the Universal Eligibility Act, more than 10,000 applications have been received.

Many parents of private school students currently obtain tuition through one of the many tax credit programs. It pays less, however, many are likely to upgrade to a voucher.

Lewis and other opponents of the program say they fear up to $1 billion could be lost in funding for the public school system. K-12 schools currently receive about $8 billion a year in public funding.

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Annamaria Macaluso Davidson of Memorial Hermann Health System https://the-education-store.com/annamaria-macaluso-davidson-of-memorial-hermann-health-system/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/annamaria-macaluso-davidson-of-memorial-hermann-health-system/ Annamaria Macaluso Davidson, MD, MBA, vice president, Medical Operations for Employee Health, at Memorial Hermann Health System in Houston, is one of 10 emerging healthcare leaders featured in the annual healthcare article. managed health. Annamaria Macaluso Davidson, MD, MBA I grew up in Houston. After graduating cum laude from Memorial High School, I graduated magna […]]]>

Annamaria Macaluso Davidson, MD, MBA, vice president, Medical Operations for Employee Health, at Memorial Hermann Health System in Houston, is one of 10 emerging healthcare leaders featured in the annual healthcare article. managed health.

Annamaria Macaluso Davidson, MD, MBA

I grew up in Houston. After graduating cum laude from Memorial High School, I graduated magna cum laude and with honors from Texas A&M University in College Station.

After that, I earned an MD from McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas at Houston. I also earned an MBA from the University of Texas at Tyler. I am certified in occupational and environmental medicine, as well as in medical quality.

I am currently a board member of the Texas College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine and a member of the Program Evaluation and Residency Advisory Committee for Occupational and Environmental Medicine at McGovern Medical School at UTHealth Houston.

My strong work ethic is inspired by my family’s heritage: hard working men and women, skilled lifelong learners and educators, immigrants with great courage, a love of medicine and a strong commitment to their communities.

Helping to keep our workforce safe and being able to care for patients during the pandemic has been a challenge and also a privilege. There are so many benefits, dignity and power in work. Providing practical guidance to employers throughout the pandemic so their staff can work safely has also been rewarding. I led an effort to implement new, first-in-class rapid molecular (COVID-19) tests in diverse settings across Memorial Hermann, providing an improved clinical and patient experience.

Why did you decide to pursue a career in healthcare?

I grew up around medicine. My father is a dentist and my grandfather is an allergist and pediatrician. The extended family is full of surgeons, radiologists, pharmacists and hospital administrators. Medicine has always been at the top of my list. I also thought about education, but ultimately opted for medicine because I could practice and incorporate education into my work. I have seen firsthand the honor of the profession and the blessing of learning a skill and helping and serving others through these gifts. I am proud of my heritage. He inspires me every day.

What professional achievement are you most proud of and why?

I am grateful to have been able to work and train during my early years with Memorial Hermann. But I am most proud to have reached my current position. We have a talented, caring and skilled workforce. And we have such a big goal that drives our work: to improve the health of our community. In this role, I work with businesses in our city to improve the health of their workforces and workplaces.

What is the hardest part of your current job?

Tell the story of our work. There is so much good work being done, but synthesizing, standardizing, creating and disseminating information and data across a large organization can be challenging. It’s also very inspiring to organize the details and create the visuals.

What is your organization doing to address equity in health care?

Memorial Hermann has wonderful partnerships with our community to create better access to care and resources in underserved communities, in the workplace, and in our community at large. We are continually improving, striving to provide personalized and compassionate care to every member of the community. We value everyone’s unique identity and contribution as we learn, design the client and employee experience, and practice medicine.

If you could change one thing about healthcare in the United States, what would it be?

Ensure healthcare workers feel valued and appreciated – bringing joy back to work by building community, reducing waste, improving resilience and doing goal-oriented work.

How to avoid burnout?

I am constantly reminded of the purpose of my work: to improve the health of our communities, to honor and support my family, and to work with excellence for the Lord. There are also practical tools that bring rest and refreshment: working out, organizing (think “The Home Edit”!), cooking, entertaining, giving thanks, and spending time with my husband, four kids, and extended family.

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We need to reinvent our Ed. System, NAEP Results Show (Opinion) https://the-education-store.com/we-need-to-reinvent-our-ed-system-naep-results-show-opinion/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 16:09:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/we-need-to-reinvent-our-ed-system-naep-results-show-opinion/ For the editor: The recent release of the National Assessment of Educational Progress illustrates what we already know: there is no doubt that many students have experienced trauma and unfinished learning over the past three school years (“Digging Deeper Into the Stark Declines on NAEP: 5 Things to Know,” September 2, 2022). Many students need […]]]>

For the editor:

The recent release of the National Assessment of Educational Progress illustrates what we already know: there is no doubt that many students have experienced trauma and unfinished learning over the past three school years (“Digging Deeper Into the Stark Declines on NAEP: 5 Things to Know,” September 2, 2022). Many students need personalized approaches and additional supports. But instead of focusing on catching up, let’s take the opportunity to rethink how our education system works.

In fact, 91% of parents are calling for reinventing education to better meet student needs, according to a May 2021 survey of public school parents.. It’s time to modernize education to better recognize the learning and skills development that has happened during the pandemic.

What if we completely reimagined the way we assess student progress? The evaluation must be meaningful. This should allow students to show what they know and demonstrate their mastery, tell them in real time how they are progressing and what they need to do next, and give them the support they need to do so.

Unfortunately, the 2022 data from Learning Heroes show a disconnect between perception and reality of student progress – around 92% of parents and guardians say their child is at or above grade level in reading and math. But the most recent results from the NAEP show that less than a third of students are proficient.

None of this is new. Children have always been in different places in terms of progress in acquiring knowledge and skills. But we need to redesign learning experiences to be more student-centered and relevant to families and communities. Our education systems simply haven’t learned to personalize learning to meet these needs and create competency-based pathways.

Let’s use this time to reimagine what our education system can look like to be more personalized, equitable and just for all learners to prepare them for a thriving future and lifelong learning.

Susan Patrick
President and CEO
Aurora Institute
Arlington, Virginia.

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Tangi School System Seeks Feedback for Early Years Grant | Briefs https://the-education-store.com/tangi-school-system-seeks-feedback-for-early-years-grant-briefs/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 18:35:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/tangi-school-system-seeks-feedback-for-early-years-grant-briefs/ The Tangipahoa Parish school system received the Strengthening Community Supply and Expanding Access Phase I grant to increase the quality of early childhood care and education. “Early childhood education is a high priority in the Tangipahoa Parish public school system. Our earliest understandings shape who we become as adults and the quality of life we […]]]>






The Tangipahoa Parish school system received the Strengthening Community Supply and Expanding Access Phase I grant to increase the quality of early childhood care and education.

“Early childhood education is a high priority in the Tangipahoa Parish public school system. Our earliest understandings shape who we become as adults and the quality of life we ​​lead. Research tells us that the period between birth and age 3 is a time of rapid brain development where billions of connections are made. Experiences from birth to age 8 affect the development of brain architecture and form the basis for all future learning, behavior and health. As we prioritize early learning opportunities, our chances of reducing poverty and increasing economic success are high. Our early childhood education programs are a means of prevention and intervention,” said Superintendent Melissa Stilley.

The superintendent said the grant requires community input, so the district is asking the public to help its Ready Start Network by providing feedback and sharing their needs on the following surveys:

The Workforce Feedback Survey can be viewed at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/M62SRP9

The parent feedback survey can be viewed at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/5D5P5DD

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Have your say on Hawaii’s public education system | News, Sports, Jobs https://the-education-store.com/have-your-say-on-hawaiis-public-education-system-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 05:06:47 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/have-your-say-on-hawaiis-public-education-system-news-sports-jobs/ The Hawaii State Board of Education is developing its strategic plan for Hawaii’s public education system and has launched a Strategic Planning Engagement Survey as part of a community engagement process complete. Take the survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PVP528P. It is accessible by computer, phone or tablet, but it can only be completed once on […]]]>

The Hawaii State Board of Education is developing its strategic plan for Hawaii’s public education system and has launched a Strategic Planning Engagement Survey as part of a community engagement process complete.

Take the survey at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/PVP528P. It is accessible by computer, phone or tablet, but it can only be completed once on each device.

The survey is designed to provide the public with an opportunity to share their opinions on priority areas the board should focus on to improve the state’s public education system and provide insight into how the system is currently responding. the needs of students, families, schools and communities.

Citizens are invited to complete the online survey, which should take no more than ten minutes to complete, before the October 11, 2022 deadline.

Results will be compiled and shared with council and the public in late October or early November.

In addition, the Council will hold open community meetings throughout the state to further discuss the public’s opinions and ideas about how Hawaii’s public education system can improve to meet the needs of all. students.

Join the process and share how Maui schools can be improved.

According to the Board of Education, “Your input is very important to the success of this process. Please take the survey and encourage your colleagues, friends and family to join you in this important opportunity to shape the future of education in Hawaii.


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Connecticut city school system short of dozens of teachers https://the-education-store.com/connecticut-city-school-system-short-of-dozens-of-teachers/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 21:53:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/connecticut-city-school-system-short-of-dozens-of-teachers/ School system leaders said they recognize the unique challenges facing their teachers. NEW HAVEN, Conn. – New Haven’s public school system is in desperate need of teachers, confirming this week that it is short by dozens. So, they recently worked with the teachers’ union on a temporary solution. After tallying up recent hirings, retirements and […]]]>

School system leaders said they recognize the unique challenges facing their teachers.

NEW HAVEN, Conn. – New Haven’s public school system is in desperate need of teachers, confirming this week that it is short by dozens. So, they recently worked with the teachers’ union on a temporary solution.

After tallying up recent hirings, retirements and quits, New Haven Public Schools said they are currently 70 to 80 teachers short.

“I know they just started but, you know, every day it’s a substitute teacher, not the original teachers they had, so it hurts,” said April Gore, whose daughter is dating Wilbur Cross High School.

“I’ve been a teacher since 2007 and we’ve never had vacancies like this before,” said Leslie Blatteau, president of the New Haven Federation of Teachers.

RELATED: New Haven 4th grader not picked up by school bus for first 2 weeks of school

Blatteau, who worked on a national task force on teacher shortages, said many teachers are leaving for better-paying jobs in the suburbs.

“The work of a teacher has become much more complicated, much more intense, much more stressful than ever before,” Blatteau said in her office Wednesday morning.

“They need to be paid more money,” said Stacy Viera, a parent from Wilbur Cross High School. “So maybe they’ll have enough teachers and classes full of teachers.”

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But the teachers’ union and the school system, for now, reached agreement on a memorandum of understanding this week.

“According to our contract, our departmental teachers teach five lessons a day and so this MOU says OK, our teachers who teach five a day can assume this sixth, but as a result, they will be paid 20% of their salary to assume this sixth,” explained Blatteau.

School system leaders said they recognize the unique challenges facing their teachers.

“Whether it’s food insecurity, to make sure they have the proper social, emotional and mental support,” said Dr. Paul Whyte, assistant superintendent of New Haven Public Schools.

RELATED: Are You Sharing Too Much About Your Child Online?

Blatteau said she and other union representatives will lobby lawmakers to approve more money for teachers’ salaries in the 2023 session.

“For me, one of the things that would really help is state support and also teacher loan relief for people who are going to school to study to be teachers,” said Erica Holahan, whose daughter is a senior at Hillhouse High School.

The school system is working on all sorts of recruitment and retention ideas, Whyte said, and also noted that math, science, special education and English teachers are the ones the school system has the most. need.

Tony Terzi is a reporter at FOX61 News. He can be reached at tterzi@fox61.com. Follow him on Facebook, Twitter and instagram.

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Disfigurements of our educational system https://the-education-store.com/disfigurements-of-our-educational-system/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 06:01:12 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/disfigurements-of-our-educational-system/ One of the things that public dissemination of the results of major examinations in our primary and secondary education systems usually does is to present what might be called “the good side” of an education system. When the vicissitudes of the Covid-19 pandemic are added to the much longer challenges that our education system has […]]]>

One of the things that public dissemination of the results of major examinations in our primary and secondary education systems usually does is to present what might be called “the good side” of an education system.

When the vicissitudes of the Covid-19 pandemic are added to the much longer challenges that our education system has had to face, the performance of our children in these exams gives every reason to celebrate.

Barely two months after St. George’s Secondary School was destroyed by fire, a circumstance which created an immediate emergency regarding the continuity of education for some 400 students, we are told that the Ministry of Education has put in place what Guyanese commonly refer to as a “duplication” scheme in some schools to allow displaced students to be accommodated in alternative schools so that there is no disruption in provision. of their education.

“Doubling”, in our circumstances, has become commonplace, there is no other option when public schools are rendered “out of service”, mainly due to fires which completely destroy schools or damage them sufficiently to cause the need for extensive and time-consuming repairs. It is imagined that what can also be called “stopgap” lawsuits, insofar as they are far from ideal options, are bound to have an impact on the normal regimes in the reception schools. , although there is no reliable channel through which we can properly determine the extent of the impact of these interventions on the overall quality of education provided in host schools.

We may, for example, not know how well they are able to “make room” comfortably for their displaced colleagues, as they may well have already faced their pre-existing limitations, including “teacher pressures”. In our situation, such makeshift settlements will inevitably pose their own, often daunting, challenges for both displaced children and host school populations. Of course, the scale of the challenge for host schools as well as their hosts will vary from case to case.

What must also be said – and the multilateral school in North Ruimveldt is a good example of this – is that the conditions faced by both the displaced children and the schools which have to temporarily absorb them are not less bearable in that it does not appear that the restoration of affected schools to repair condition is generally pursued by the authorities with anything even remotely resembling maximum eagerness. Certainly, in such obvious emergency circumstances, there must be a transparent and expeditious “fast track” mechanism to ensure that affected schools are restored and returned to service as soon as possible. This is usually not the case.

Rehabilitating schools that have been rendered unusable (by fire or otherwise) is not a matter that simmers in public space every day, but when you think about it – and given the various other pre-existing deficiencies of our education system – there is every reason to accelerate the restoration of the affected schools since the burden that the “duplication” option imposes on the schools, both on the holders and on the displaced children, can and ends up becoming, sooner or later late, expensive.

One would have thought that if it had been felt that the right thing to do was to provide reassurance about the fast food at St. George’s High School nearly two months after it was completely destroyed by fire, then the authorities would have, now and at the earliest at the very least, sought to completely remove the unsightly rubble left by the fire. This, even if, to our knowledge, there are uncertainties as to whether or not a new school will be built on the current site.

No information on this subject has been provided. Aside from the dispersal of affected children to schools elsewhere, including in Region Three (here we imagine that questions of transport costs for parents arise) there are other problems that will have to be resolved including those that have to do with aspects of the sustainability of existing makeshift arrangements.

Incidentally, presenting the reason for the power outages for the fires that recently razed two large urban public schools, creating a significant disruption to our education system in less than a year, raises the questions (and those- These are by no means new questions) regarding the far less than warranted attention that the government, over the years, has given to maintaining “good order of infrastructure” in public schools. Indeed, evidence obtained in some public schools suggests that there is a considerable lack of official vigilance on issues such as the safety and reliability of electrical systems and some of the other broader infrastructural considerations that go into keeping these schools safe. schools. In context, it may well be that in the cases of North Ruimveldt and St. George’s secondary schools, the conflagrations could have been avoided.

For the schools involved, the question also arises whether the makeshift arrangements put in place when emergencies such as fires occur may not persist too long, providing comfort zones that divert the attention to the importance of tackling substantive remediation efforts with the requisite alacrity. In the case of the North Ruimveldt Multilateral School, it’s already been a year…and counting.

In the case of St. George’s, the apparent official indifference to the removal of the unsightly rubble left behind following the fire that destroyed the school nearly two months ago is far from reassuring. If anything, what it does is dampen hopes that there are plans to rebuild the school in a hurry, if at all.

It could be argued, from a mathematical standpoint, that while adding a few dozen displaced children from St. George’s to classes in temporary “reception schools” should not make a huge logistical difference, those who are directly responsible for the education delivery regime in this altered environment can face with considerable justification that the “random” (perhaps even arbitrarily) integration of handfuls of displaced children from St. George into different schools does not contribute, by any stretch of the imagination, to what might be called a friendly learning environment.

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