Education system – The Education Store http://the-education-store.com/ Tue, 17 May 2022 20:03:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://the-education-store.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png Education system – The Education Store http://the-education-store.com/ 32 32 The Westchester Library System eVan team is ready, willing and able to promote digital inclusion in Westchester County https://the-education-store.com/the-westchester-library-system-evan-team-is-ready-willing-and-able-to-promote-digital-inclusion-in-westchester-county/ Tue, 17 May 2022 20:03:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/the-westchester-library-system-evan-team-is-ready-willing-and-able-to-promote-digital-inclusion-in-westchester-county/ WLS eVan Logo (LR: Joe Maurantonio, Westchester County Executive George Latimer, Dana Hysell and Krishna Brodigan) Table Setup The Westchester Library System eVan will promote digital inclusion in Westchester County while helping individuals and families in need of technology ELMSFORD, NEW YORK, USA, May 17, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — The Westchester Library System (WLS) is pleased […]]]>

WLS eVan Logo

(LR: Joe Maurantonio, Westchester County Executive George Latimer, Dana Hysell and Krishna Brodigan)

Table Setup

The Westchester Library System eVan will promote digital inclusion in Westchester County while helping individuals and families in need of technology

ELMSFORD, NEW YORK, USA, May 17, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — The Westchester Library System (WLS) is pleased to announce the launch of its eVan team and the Digital Equity on the Road project. This group of dedicated team members are committed to promoting digital inclusion here in Westchester County to help individuals and families in our county who need technology to access and participate in lifelong learning. long life, employment opportunities, health information and other essential services.

The eVan team will make scheduled visits to community organizations and local events with a tabletop display and 10 x 10 tent filled with valuable resources to assist community members with information on how to apply for the Affordable Connectivity Program (ACP) to obtain loan access points and digital devices from their library, obtain free library cards and access online resources. Digital browsers will also provide technical assistance and promote online safety.

In addition to the eVan team tours, later in June the launch of the official eVan mobile unit will hit the road and also begin touring Westchester County. This mobile technology and information van will travel to sites throughout the county and is fully equipped with internet connection, solar panels and digital devices that will allow visitors to connect to resources and receive training technological. The eVan can accommodate up to 12 visitors with a tent and has 2,500 square feet of Wi-Fi range.

“This eVan is a gateway to civic and cultural participation for all members of our community. It is vital to provide digital access for education, healthcare, employment and essential services. We want to uplift our Westchester communities, so that everyone receives the resources they need to grow, develop and succeed,” said Westchester County Executive George Latimer.

The eVan will be made up of two professionals, including a bilingual trainer in digital resources, and the eVan team will devote up to 20 hours per week to it. This initiative was made possible through federal American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funding provided to the New York State Library by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and county government funds of Westchester.

“We are excited about the launch of our eVan project as we strive to bridge the digital divide present in many of our communities,” said Terry Kirchner, Executive Director of the Westchester Library System. “The Westchester Library System looks forward to providing individuals and families across the county with access to technology to pursue lifelong learning, seek employment opportunities and receive other essential services. .”

The eVan team began to bridge this digital divide with visits to Neighbors Link, a non-profit organization that helps provide education, community development, career and legal support to immigrants. The eVan team also visited the Interfaith Council for Action, a non-profit organization in Ossining that supports community, diversity, and opportunity through affordable/workforce housing and social services vital. White Plains ComicFest was also on the list of eVan teams for a fun visit to the Galleria mall, which the White Plains Youth Bureau sponsored, and the 54th annual Westchester County Seniors Tribute is also on the list, with tours Wednesday mornings in May to share this great resource with seniors in our county.

The eVan project is actively booking sites throughout Westchester County this spring and summer, focusing on Mount Vernon, Mount Kisco, Ossining, Peekskill and Yonkers, New York. For more information about the eVan or the Digital Equity on the Road project, please contact Joe Maurantonio, Director of Special Projects at the Westchester Library System, (914) 231-3275 or email dei@wlsmail.org to know more. Please visit https://www.westchesterdigitalequity.org/ to see the eVan schedule or check out the eVan Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/wlsdigitalequity. If your organization would like to schedule a free visit from the eVan team, please contact Katherine Gasparich at PR To Remember at (914) 218-3968 or by email at: KatherineG@EventsRemember.com.

About the Westchester Library System: A focus on community engagement and outreach provides the framework for Westchester Library System (WLS) programs and services. Through partnerships with member libraries, government agencies, service organizations, community members, Westchester County and others, WLS can help them create and grow welcoming and inclusive services and programs. for all residents of their community and county.

Chereese Jervis Hill
Events to remember
+1 914-218-3968
write to us here

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This is what the “Russification” of the Ukrainian education system looks like in the occupied areas https://the-education-store.com/this-is-what-the-russification-of-the-ukrainian-education-system-looks-like-in-the-occupied-areas/ Mon, 16 May 2022 04:08:50 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/this-is-what-the-russification-of-the-ukrainian-education-system-looks-like-in-the-occupied-areas/ Troops held her husband and daughter at gunpoint, but the 48-year-old told CNN she knew it was for her they had come. As a school principal, she believes they saw her as the enemy. “They were searching everywhere, even the drains and outhouses,” she said. “They found textbooks and tutorials for the Ukrainian language.” Nina […]]]>

Troops held her husband and daughter at gunpoint, but the 48-year-old told CNN she knew it was for her they had come. As a school principal, she believes they saw her as the enemy.

“They were searching everywhere, even the drains and outhouses,” she said. “They found textbooks and tutorials for the Ukrainian language.”

Nina is not alone. Ukrainian officials said educators in areas of the country newly occupied by Russia have reported increased cases of intimidation, threats and pressure to adapt school curricula to align with pro-Russian rhetoric.

As war tears Ukraine apart, education has become a casualty of the conflict and a potential battleground in the struggle for control of the country.

Before the invasion of Russian troops on February 24, about 4.23 million students were enrolled in schools across the country, according to data compiled by the Ukrainian Institute of Educational Analysis, an agency of State. Today, millions of school-aged children have been internally displaced or forced to flee abroad with their families.

After searching her house, Nina said the soldiers – who forced her to speak Russian – “gave me a minute to get dressed and took me to school”.

Once they arrived, she was ordered to hand over the history textbooks and be questioned about the school’s curriculum. “They came with requests but spoke very politely,” recalls the educator. “They took a laptop from the safe – it wasn’t even mine; it was an elementary school teacher’s laptop – and two history books for eighth grade.”

She said her captors put a black hood over her head before putting her in a vehicle and taking her to another location where her interrogation continued.

“They asked about my attitude towards the ‘military operation’, they accused me of being too patriotic, too nationalistic,” she said. “They asked why I use the Ukrainian language…why I go to the Ukrainian church.”

Nina said they wanted her to reopen the school and make sure the children came back, but she argued it was not safe for students or teachers.

“I don’t know how long they detained me, I didn’t feel the time, I was sitting in this black hood, they only took it off during the interrogation,” continued Nina, whose name family member CNN withheld for security reasons.

She was eventually released, but not before her captors “emphasized that they knew about my son and reminded me that I had a daughter,” she said, adding, “I considered that as a threat”.

A few days later, fearing that Russian troops would return, Nina and her family fled.

Russian interference

Nina’s experience is not an isolated incident. Reports of threats against educators in newly occupied areas grew steadily as the conflict escalated.

A teacher told CNN that Russian troops approached the principal of her school and “ordered him to hand over all Ukrainian language and history textbooks, but the principal refused. His stance was so strict that they did not exert any further pressure. … They left empty-handed.”

Some teachers have been able to resume lessons for students online, using virtual classrooms similar to those put in place during the coronavirus pandemic. But for others, classes have come to a halt as internet services are disrupted and schools close to the fighting have been forced to close.

At least 1,570 educational institutions have been destroyed or damaged by shelling since the start of the Russian invasion, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky said in his May 2 evening address. The president’s claims have not been independently verified by CNN.

Ukraine accused Russia of drop a bomb on a school in the Luhansk region on May 7 where 90 people had taken refuge. Serhiy Hayday, head of the Luhansk regional military administration, said the building was flattened during the strike. Sixty people are said to have died.

The country’s education ombudsman, Serhii Horbachov, told CNN the government has received more than 100 reports and pleas for help from teachers, parents and students in occupied areas since February.

“Employees of educational institutions who remained in the occupation risk their own lives and health, [and] are subject to coercion, violence and pressure,” Horbachev said.

“There are known cases of kidnapping of school principals and headmasters,” he added. “Teachers are forced to cooperate and work in schools under machine gun fire.”

“Russification” in the occupied areas

Other examples of Russian forces trying to eradicate Ukrainian identity in the newly occupied areas have been seen in the southern region of Kherson, according to Serhii Khlan, a representative of the regional council, who has repeatedly accused the troops of occupation to threaten educators in recent weeks.

Khlan said Thursday that Russian forces were attacking villages and launching intensive searches, as well as carrying out a census of those who remained in certain areas. He also claimed that the Russians have indicated “that they will import teachers from Crimea because our teachers do not agree to work on Russian programs. Those few teachers who agree to work, we know them personally, and they will be held criminally responsible.”

Khlan previously warned that Kakhovka city managers were under threat in late April.

His latest remarks came as a report emerged that a new principal had been installed by “occupiers” at a school in Kakhovka after the former principal was allegedly kidnapped on May 11, according to a local journalist.

Efforts to force Ukraine’s education system into line with Russian school curricula mirror similar Russification efforts in areas overrun by Russian forces and Russian-backed separatists in previous years. Russian President Vladimir Putin – whose baseless claims of widespread oppression of Russian-speaking Ukrainians provided a pretext for the February 24 Russian invasion – has made it clear in his own public statements that he does not view Ukraine as a legitimate nation.

Oleh Okhredko is a seasoned educator with over two decades of teaching experience and an analyst at the Almenda Center for Civic Education, an organization originally based in Crimea that monitors education in the occupied territories. He told CNN it was a strategy he witnessed after Russia annexed Crimea in 2014.

“Crimea has become such an experimental field for Russia. Here they started the militarization of education in general,” he explained.

He said Russian propaganda reframing historical events had been inserted into Crimea’s school curriculum – which he said had a hugely detrimental effect on children there.

“Ukraine has been completely removed from school textbooks and everything becomes ‘Russian history’,” Okhredko explained. “Busy children are really very influenced by their upbringing in [a] system that constantly needs to have an enemy. Now the enemies are the United States and Ukraine. And that hostility begins to manifest itself in children in the form of aggression.”

He added: “Those children who studied in school six to eight years ago – when they were between 11 and 13 years old – are now fighting against Ukraine. Ukrainian citizens are unfortunately fighting against their country.”

Ukrainian opposition

For now, many educators in occupied areas of Ukraine are trying to resist Russian attempts to adjust their school curriculum, fearing the impact any changes could have on their students in the long run.

In the Luhansk region, Maria, a math teacher and member of the region’s school administration, told CNN her members were given an ultimatum to teach using a Russian curriculum. Maria was given a pseudonym to protect her identity.

“Of course we told them we wouldn’t. And they said, ‘We’ll see. We have a file for each of you.’ It’s scary,” said Maria, adding that they were then emailed Russian textbooks with the request that they “at least read and then decide, because the curriculum is really nice.”

Displaced people from the Kyiv region are accommodated in the gymnasium of a local school in the Ivano-Frankivsk region in western Ukraine.

“They tried to persuade us. But we told them, we don’t have internet here and we haven’t received anything,” she explained.

“They even asked ‘What’s the difference – Why is it important to study in Ukrainian or Russian? You teach math – it’s the same in all languages.’ I wanted some… and I told them, your education, your papers are not recognized anywhere, the children will not be able to go to university. And they answered: “Which universities? To do what ? We need workers and soldiers.”

As Russia’s invasion of Ukraine continues, Maria remains scared but hopeful.

“We are afraid that they will remove the material from the schools, we have a lot of new good things in our school,” she said. “We are desperately awaiting the arrival of our military, we believe it will happen soon.”

CNN’s Ivana Kottasova, Tim Lister and Julia Presniakova contributed to this report from Lviv, Ukraine. Journalists Olga Voitovych and Julia Kesa contributed from Kyiv, Ukraine.

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Rise of the BNPL and its impact on the credit system https://the-education-store.com/rise-of-the-bnpl-and-its-impact-on-the-credit-system/ Sat, 14 May 2022 02:58:20 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/rise-of-the-bnpl-and-its-impact-on-the-credit-system/ Buy Now, Pay Later (BNPL) is in vogue these days. From retailers to consumers, BNPL has been a win-win transaction facility in various aspects. As the name suggests, Buy Now Pay Later platforms offer the ability to pay later while ensuring a quick purchase of goods. Customers can easily convert the payment amount into shorter […]]]>

Buy Now, Pay Later (BNPL) is in vogue these days. From retailers to consumers, BNPL has been a win-win transaction facility in various aspects.

As the name suggests, Buy Now Pay Later platforms offer the ability to pay later while ensuring a quick purchase of goods. Customers can easily convert the payment amount into shorter term EMI. These EMIs are reimbursed over a few months depending on convenience. Normally, such an arrangement is completely of no interest to the client. Retailers or merchants themselves bear the burden of this interest in most cases to promote their business.

Vikas Bansal, Director of Amazon Pay (India), says: “The Buy Now Pay Later culture has grown tremendously over the years, especially creating a niche market in India, filling one of the biggest gaps, the need for an easy credit-based lending system, making it a frontrunner and a flexible option for customers in the midst of a fragmented, hard-to-access, and highly paperwork-intensive credit market.”

Increase in the use of BNPL

Over the past few years, there has been a big boom in BNPL transactions. A large number of people have started using this payment technology in the crisis of dwindling jobs and uncertain incomes after covid. The BNPL system is very popular with young people or people using the credit facility for the first time.

According to some research reports, young people use BNPL the most for purchases related to expensive smartphones, major appliances, vehicles, fashion, etc. Companies offering such facilities have seen a huge increase in BNPL applications.

Amazon Pay, LazyPay, AirPay, Paytm, Flipkart, Zest Money and many more are the organizations providing BNPL facilities to people these days.

Anup Agrawal, Chief Commercial Officer of LazyPay, says: “BNPL represents a growing payment trend as consumers, especially young Indians, are increasingly looking to defer their payments as they want to enjoy experiences and avoid engaging in long-term debts.the experience offered by BNPL, easy accessibility and the rise of digital payment is driving demand for BNPL as it emerges as a preferred payment method for many.With changing preferences of consumers, namely digital and convenient contactless products, Buy Now Pay Later will continue to see higher adoption in the years to come.”

Reason for trend

The main reason for the appeal of the BNPL payment system is convenience and cost reduction. Although it is an alternative to credit cards, it is of no interest to most people. Also, due to the lack of hidden charges, people are attracted to this side.

Kunal Jhunjhunwala, Founder and Managing Director of Airpay, said, “BNPL ushers in a shift in credit availability similar to UPI brought to wire transfers or bank payments. It facilitates impulse purchases for consumers and expands digital payments. for merchants. But as the old saying goes, with great power comes great responsibility. Easy access coupled with lack of awareness and higher impulse spending can easily put consumers on the path to a consumer trap. debt. Most consumers are not fully aware that such purchases are listed in their credit history and therefore the impact.”

Concessions are also available to the customer in terms of payment. BNPL also benefited from the complicated process of banks lending and reducing credit limit at the time of covid. The main reason for the rapid expansion of Buy Now Pay Later is also its availability for common customers.

Future with BNPL

The BNPL market is expected to reach in the future USD 20.4 billion by 2028 and over USD 1 trillion in annual gross merchandise volume (GMV) by 2025 globally. The Indian BNPL market already exists with a size of Rs 22,500 crore.

BNPL can eventually set a credit standard in a lending industry like India. Here are the experts’ opinions on it:

“I think going forward this will broaden the formal credit base. However, what is needed is good visibility and proper education for the consumer to appreciate the impact of this facility. Most of consumers still do not understand that BNPL is a line of credit. This education needs to be more academic and knowledge-focused rather than technology-focused. The facility has incredible reach to draw more people into the formal credit system. ~ Kunal Jhunjhunwala, Founder and Managing Director, Airpay.

“India is massively underpenetrated when it comes to credit. In a country of nearly 1.4 billion people, up to 191 million people over the age of 15 were unbanked in 2018, and that has not changed much over the past few years.There are limitations in terms of access to credit for India’s unbanked population and credit newbie population especially the youth.Additionally, the cumbersome process of applying for credit cards, right from submitting supporting documents, linking Aadhaar cards, filling application forms etc. adds to the woes of young Indians who demand a quick and hassle-free experience. increase in consumers for convenient and fast payment options like Buy Now Pay Later (BNPL).” ~ Anup Agarwal, Business Leader, LazyPay.

“BNPL continues to evolve and help redefine customer habits. In the years to come, BNPL will evolve significantly, creating new avenues beyond the e-commerce platform and Amazon Pay will continue to innovate on behalf of our customers.” ~ Vikas Bansal, Director, Amazon Pay.


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In Sri Lanka, People’s Uprising for System Change Global Voices Français https://the-education-store.com/in-sri-lanka-peoples-uprising-for-system-change-global-voices-francais/ Thu, 12 May 2022 03:45:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/in-sri-lanka-peoples-uprising-for-system-change-global-voices-francais/ Sri Lankans in London are protesting against their President, Gotabaya Rajapaksa and Prime Minister, Mahinda Rajapaksa. picture by Ehimetalor Akhere Unuabona on Unsplash. Free to use under the Unsplash License. This article was first published by a Sri Lankan jurist, author, poet and activist Basil Fernando in Ground views, an award-winning citizen media website. An […]]]>

Sri Lankans in London are protesting against their President, Gotabaya Rajapaksa and Prime Minister, Mahinda Rajapaksa. picture by Ehimetalor Akhere Unuabona on Unsplash. Free to use under the Unsplash License.

This article was first published by a Sri Lankan jurist, author, poet and activist Basil Fernando in Ground views, an award-winning citizen media website. An edited version is posted here under a content sharing agreement with Global Voices.

April and May 2022 will be remembered as the most important months of the post-independence era in Sri Lanka. During this short period, the long-awaited popular awakening expressed itself with force. Those in authority did not see the writing on the wall although the wall is right next to the presidential secretariat and all over the country. Prime Minister Mahinda Rajapaksa thought he only saw ghosts. President Gotabaya Rajapaksa believed in the comforting words of his friends when he knew the treasury was empty. The entire political establishment has preferred to take refuge in a fool’s paradise.

Some of them have rallied Mahinda Rajapaksa on May 9 to try intimidation tactics to quell the protest movement. It went wrong and the nation rose to defend the protesters and fight back against the violence. This brought the Rajapaksa era to an end although Gotabaya Rajapaksa nominally remains president. He is now an isolated person to protect.

The real problem now is what’s next? Only the people of Sri Lanka can give a valid answer to this question. Without their direct participation, no solution can emerge. The major problem is how to enable people to become agents of political and social change to solve the economic crisis. This can only happen if the national protest movement takes a step closer to achieving the goals it is fighting for by launching a discourse on how to achieve system change. That they want the existing political leaders, who are unwilling and unable to meet the heavy demands of the people, to go is quite clear.

There are several issues on which there is consensus among the people.

The law and law enforcement

There should be a review of the law and practice regarding deficiencies in the corruption control system. It is essential to reveal to the people why this system has failed to achieve its goals in such a dramatic way, causing difficulties and difficulties not only to individuals but also to the economic and political system. Legislative and institutional mechanisms can be developed to ensure methods of controlling corruption. There are many lessons to be learned from other countries, and experts in the field can willingly help Sri Lanka.

Democracy and rule of law

A system of governance based on democratic principles and rooted in the tradition of the rule of law and the rule of law should be incorporated into all laws, including that of the constitution. Any provision of law, whether found in legislation or in the constitution, shall be deemed to have no legal force if the principles relating to democracy, the rule of law and the rule of law are violated. If this recommendation is implemented, many problems related to the Constitution of 1978 can be corrected.

In all speeches that deal with the resolution of the current economic crisis, people should be informed of the discussions; attempts at secrecy must be rejected. People should be encouraged to participate in their localities and in their professional capacities to discuss ways to end the economic crisis and lay the foundations of principles and practices for dealing with economic issues. Local traditions and conventions should be built that would become part of the social consciousness, as has happened in countries where there has been genuine democratic change. People should be able to intervene in any interference with their economic system and their well-being.

Taxation

A fair and equitable tax system should be established as soon as possible. The wealthy classes resisted being subject to a just tax system. When certain attempts were made by previous governments, the propaganda machinery was unleashed and the governments were defeated. A decisive attempt should be made to develop and implement a tax system where the wealthier income groups share the burdens of maintaining a sound economic life.

A clear agricultural policy

A clear agricultural policy should be developed in consultation with farmers, agricultural experts, economists and all who care to ensure that the food supply is not sabotaged by unnecessary imports and also to eliminate commissions when import of imports. This is linked to the strengthening of the legal system.

Opening political space to youth

Young people now play their role in political and social life. They are a new generation with a different understanding of society and with attitudes that were not possessed by previous generations. Every effort should be made to bring these younger elements into the public discourse. Respect for freedom of expression, association and assembly is essential when dealing with a societal crisis. When the younger generation enters public debates, they should be allowed to participate. This will cause a major shift in political culture.

Right to education

It is essential to preserve the right to education. In the face of the economic crisis, no attempt should be made to deprive young people of the rights to better education, which will contribute to economic development and economic and political stability.

food and medicine

There should be no shortage of food or medicine. The first priority is to ensure that a food crisis does not occur because of the measures taken to overcome the economic crisis. From now on, the government, as well as the international humanitarian organizations, must help Sri Lanka to avoid a catastrophic situation. There is already an increase in malnutrition as well as hunger-related suicides.

Money laundering and recovery of stolen national assets

the diversion of national wealth by individuals should be a matter of the utmost importance. Neither Sri Lankans abroad nor foreign investors will help overcome the economic crisis if they believe funds are being misappropriated. Many steps must be taken to ensure justice and fairness in all investigations and prosecutions and to ensure that the guilty do not escape. Anything illegally removed and deposited elsewhere should be properly investigated and recoveries made. Many international organizations are working on the issue of discovering the wealth of stolen nations with greater cooperation between nations.

The birth of a new social consciousness

It is the most agonizing experience that many Sri Lankans have had. Such moments can shape people’s political consciousness. Nationwide protests indicate that people are deeply concerned about their lives and the lives of their children. The people are united in the cry to save the country from the economic and political crisis it is facing. It is then that a deeper consensus emerges about what people want to be and what kind of institutions their societies need. People have a reason to show their resilience and participate in a process to improve their future prospects.

Now the discourse must change to seek answers to these questions.

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Mental Health Crisis in Vermont: Opportunities and Solutions to Create a Better System of Care https://the-education-store.com/mental-health-crisis-in-vermont-opportunities-and-solutions-to-create-a-better-system-of-care/ Tue, 10 May 2022 11:54:55 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/mental-health-crisis-in-vermont-opportunities-and-solutions-to-create-a-better-system-of-care/ Dr. Mark Levine, MD, health commissioner; Wendy Walsh, RN, public health nurse; and the Vermont National Guard’s Covid-19 Mapping Team to be Recognized as Public Health Champions Vermont Business Magazine On Wednesday, May 11, from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., the Vermont Public Health Association (VtPHA) will hold its annual meeting entitled: “Vermont’s Mental Health […]]]>

Dr. Mark Levine, MD, health commissioner; Wendy Walsh, RN, public health nurse; and the Vermont National Guard’s Covid-19 Mapping Team to be Recognized as Public Health Champions

Vermont Business Magazine On Wednesday, May 11, from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., the Vermont Public Health Association (VtPHA) will hold its annual meeting entitled: “Vermont’s Mental Health Crisis: Opportunities and solutions for creating a better system of care”. Participants can attend in person at the Capitol Plaza Hotel in Montpellier or virtually via Zoom.

Ken Allen, President of VtPHA, said, “The Covid-19 pandemic has had a devastating impact on the mental health and well-being of Vermonters of all ages. In order to inform Vermonters of this crisis, we convened a roundtable with various stakeholders focused on the state of mental health and mental health services in Vermont, particularly as it relates to Vermont youth. Deputy Commissioner of Mental Health, Alison Krompf will moderate a panel discussion and provide her perspective on the current state of youth mental health resources in Vermont and provide a realistic view of the needs and opportunities for improvement in our system.

Referring to the COVID-19 pandemic, Allen says, “It’s also well known that compared to the United States, Vermont has done relatively well during the pandemic. At VtPHA, we realize that meeting public health needs during this pandemic and other crises requires teamwork and coordination between government, non-governmental organizations and individuals working across multiple sectors of the public health landscape. . VtPHA is honored to recognize some of those who have made extraordinary contributions to public health in the state of Vermont.

The Mental Health Committee will be made up of:

  • Alison Krompf, MA, Deputy Commissioner, Vermont Department of Mental Health

Alison will moderate the panel presentations and provide perspective on the data we have on the current state of the VT mental health care system and solutions on how we move forward.

  • Kristy Hommel, M.Ed., Ending the Silence Coordinator, National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI)

Kristy will share her own personal story and lived experience in the mental health system as a child and adult, and provide insight as a program coordinator for NAMI VT.

  • Haley McGowan, DO, Co-Director, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Consult Service, University of Vermont Medical Center

Haley will share her role in helping patients and families navigate an overburdened mental health system while improving quality of care and facilitating access to services through collaboration with community supports.

  • Katina Idol, MA, LCMHC, ARC Trainer, Lamoille Community Connections

With years of experience working with children and families in various school settings and supervising school-based clinicians, Katina will share her perspective on the mental health system with her unique clinical perspective.

This year’s Public Health Champions Awards will be presented to:

  • Mark Levine, MD, Vermont Health Commissioner, for his dedication and leadership to Vermonters during the Covid-19 pandemic, for his work for health equity, and for his vision for the future Vermont public health systems during Covid-19 recovery.
  • Wendy Walsh, RN, Public Health Nurse for the Vermont Department of Health for her 44 years of service to Vermonters and most recently as Co-Lead of the VDH Outbreak Prevention and Response Team who coordinated dozens of public health nurses across the state to be the local points of contact and councils for schools, businesses, nonprofits, health care or congregate living facilities as they navigated Covid-19 cases that impacted their organizations and facilities.

The Vermont National Guard Covid-19 Mapping Team for their work in ensuring that information about Covid-19 reaches communities in a timely and efficient manner, minimizing the risk of further outbreaks.

The VtPHA is a statewide membership organization that seeks to positively influence the health of all Vermonters. The VtPHA does this by providing a strong, independent voice for public health in Vermont through advocacy, education, and community engagement, and by bringing together professionals, decision-makers, and partners. To visit www.vtpha.org for more information on conference registration and membership.

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The old boys lament the continuing crises facing the Nigerian education system https://the-education-store.com/the-old-boys-lament-the-continuing-crises-facing-the-nigerian-education-system/ Sun, 08 May 2022 17:19:55 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/the-old-boys-lament-the-continuing-crises-facing-the-nigerian-education-system/ By Rose Ejembi, Makurdi Emmanuel Secondary School Old Boys Association (ESSUOBA), Ugbokolo, Benue State expressed great concern over the continuing crises facing the education system in Nigeria. The Association, through its newly elected President, Captain Patrick Olonta, said so during its 2022 Annual Delegates Convention held recently in Ugbokolo, Benue State, where new leaders were […]]]>

By Rose Ejembi, Makurdi

Emmanuel Secondary School Old Boys Association (ESSUOBA), Ugbokolo, Benue State expressed great concern over the continuing crises facing the education system in Nigeria.

The Association, through its newly elected President, Captain Patrick Olonta, said so during its 2022 Annual Delegates Convention held recently in Ugbokolo, Benue State, where new leaders were elected.

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He lamented that declining education standards, infrastructure crisis, poor examination practices, moral decay, worship, strikes and other challenges have wreaked havoc on the country’s education system.

He therefore insisted on the need to overcome these challenges to give the country a clear lever of competitiveness in the contemporary reality of a global knowledge economy.

“The role of old boys and old girls in rebuilding and directing the affairs of their alma mater through critical intervention cannot be overstated.

“Making a critical intervention to save our national education system is a vital role required of our former boys and former girls across our country to enable us to raise our education system from the lowest level it has reached and improve development human capital resources, which is the greatest weapon. competition in the 21st century.

Olonta further denounced the rapidly deplorable situation of the school in both its infrastructure and educational standards, pointing out that Emmanuel Ugbokolo Secondary School was one of the best schools in Benue State and was also highly rated nationally and run under the Catholic mission.

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He said the school which was founded in 1968 has produced Old Boys who have contributed greatly to national and international development in different fields of health, education, banking and finance, security national, political, aviation, energy and other parts of the national bureaucracy.

The President (ESSUOBA) listed former boys of the school who went on to contribute significantly to the development of the country, including people like Senator Abba Moro, Deputy Chairman of the Senate Interparliamentary Affairs Committee and former Minister inside.

Others are Major General Elias Atuh of the Nigerian Army, Prof. Agbulu, Deputy Vice Chancellor of the Federal University of Agriculture, Prof. Armstrong Adejoh of Benue State University, among others.

“Education is the foundation of national development. Therefore, any nation that disregards or takes its education system for granted runs the risk of compromising its long-term national interest,” Olonta said.

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Maine Community College System Lists 2022 Students of the Year https://the-education-store.com/maine-community-college-system-lists-2022-students-of-the-year/ Sat, 07 May 2022 04:00:12 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/maine-community-college-system-lists-2022-students-of-the-year/ The Augusta-based Maine Community College System Board of Trustees recognized the achievements of seven students selected as students of the year 2022. The following students were selected for their academic achievement and their involvement on campus and in the community, according to a press release from Maine’s two-year comprehensive college system. Ryan Ashby, Northern Maine […]]]>

The Augusta-based Maine Community College System Board of Trustees recognized the achievements of seven students selected as students of the year 2022. The following students were selected for their academic achievement and their involvement on campus and in the community, according to a press release from Maine’s two-year comprehensive college system.

Ryan Ashby, Northern Maine Community College

Ashby, of Mapleton, is enrolled in NMCC’s business administration program. When a serious car accident nearly sidelined his studies, he said NMCC faculty and staff worked with him to ensure he could complete his classes while recovering, earning his online diploma.

Ashby volunteers at her local church and uses her wellness journey to motivate others. His commitment has paid off and he plans to graduate this spring.

He plans to transfer and get a bachelor’s degree, with the goal of eventually getting his master’s in business administration, and working in employee development or operations and management.

Suzanne Hanvey, Southern Maine Community College

Hanvey, of Saco, is enrolled in SMCC’s Liberal Studies program with a concentration in science. She is president of the Community Service Club and the Hiking and Foraging Club, and serves on the Student Senate and the SMCC Chapter of the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society while maintaining a near-perfect GPA.

Hanvey is also a Certified Behavioral Health Professional and spends 20-40 hours a week working with children who have behavioral health issues. She plans to graduate from SMCC next spring and continue her studies with the goal of embarking on a career preserving the natural habitats of animals that live in endangered areas.

Graca Muzela Photo submitted

Graça Muzela, Washington County Community College

Muzela, of Auburn, is enrolled in WCCC’s residential and commercial electrical program. Muzela, originally from Angola, is an active volunteer, providing advice to public agencies on culturally and linguistically appropriate messaging around COVID-19 for immigrants, refugees and BIPOC communities, and delivering food and providing transportation. school-aged children.

At WCCC, he works as a resident assistant. He plans to earn his journeyman electrician’s license and possibly transfer to the University of Maine to earn a degree in electrical engineering.

Julia Christmas Photo submitted

Julia Noel, Central Maine Community College

Noel, from Sabattus, is enrolled in the CMCC’s Early Childhood Education program. She is a member of the college women’s soccer team and a volunteer with Andro United, a youth indoor soccer program in Lewiston.

When not playing soccer, Noel is a Resident Assistant and is committed to improving the residential experience for students at CMCC. She is an academic mentor for the young players on the soccer team and helps organize the team’s involvement in the community.

She plans to graduate in May and pursue a career teaching kindergarten children.

Rebecca Peters, Community College of Eastern Maine

Peters, of Lincoln, is enrolled in EMCC’s criminal justice program. She completed the Phase I and II programs at the Maine Criminal Justice Academy, while taking courses at EMCC. She earned her police officer certification in Maine two months before graduating from EMCC and was sworn in as a full-time police officer with the Lincoln Police Department in February.

She is completing field officer training and will eventually complete basic law enforcement training at the MCJA.

Tyler Sar, York County Community College

Sar, from Sanford, is enrolled in the YCCC Criminal Justice Program. A first-generation student, he was named top of his class at Maine Criminal Justice Corrections Academy.

With his degree in criminal justice from the YCCC and the successful completion of his academic training, Sar was hired as a correctional officer with the York County Sheriff’s Department. He said he wants to make a difference in people’s lives and hopes to work with offenders to reduce recidivism and the negative impact incarceration can have on a person’s life.

Kristin Wallacker Photo submitted

Kristin Wallaker, Kennebec Valley Community College

Wallaker, of New Portland, is enrolled in KVCC’s electrical technology program. She is a member of the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society and last year was part of the All-Maine Academic Team and was honored as Maine’s New Century Scholar.

Wallaker said she’s learning the skills to pursue many opportunities in a high-demand, high-paying field, whether it’s opening her own business or joining a company. She is employed by RLC Engineering as a protection and control designer and plans to return to KVCC part-time to continue her studies in business.

Students were selected by their college faculty and staff for their academic achievement and their involvement on campus and in the community. In addition to being named Student of the Year, each student received a John and Jana Lapoint Leadership Award of $1,000.

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Student Information System Market Worth $20.5 Billion by 2027 https://the-education-store.com/student-information-system-market-worth-20-5-billion-by-2027/ Wed, 04 May 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/student-information-system-market-worth-20-5-billion-by-2027/ CHICAGO, May 4, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — According to a research report “Student Information System Market with COVID-19 Impact by Component (Solutions (Enrollment, Education, Financial Aid, and Billing) and Professional Services), End User (K-12 and Higher Education), Deployment Mode, and Region – Global Forecast to 2027″, released by MarketsandMarkets™, the global Student Information System market size […]]]>

CHICAGO, May 4, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — According to a research report Student Information System Market with COVID-19 Impact by Component (Solutions (Enrollment, Education, Financial Aid, and Billing) and Professional Services), End User (K-12 and Higher Education), Deployment Mode, and Region – Global Forecast to 2027″, released by MarketsandMarkets™, the global Student Information System market size is expected to grow from $10.2 billion in 2022 at $20.5 billion by 2027, at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 14.9% over the forecast period. The market for student information systems is driven by the need to streamline administrative processes. Additionally, the growing demand for tailored solutions is playing a key role in the growth of the student information system market.

Browse the in-depth table of contents at “Student Information System Market”

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By component, Solutions segment will retain the largest market size during the forecast period

The solution segment is estimated to account for a higher market share in the student information system market. SIS solutions are further divided into Enrollment, Academics, Financial Aid, and Billing. These solutions deliver a better student experience, re-engineer internal business processes, and create learning communities that make a difference in education. The SIS solution is gaining momentum due to the growing demand from educational institutions to automate critical student information to better manage, store and track information.

By mode of deployment, Cloud segment is expected to grow at the highest CAGR during the forecast period

The cloud segment is expected to witness the highest CAGR growth over the forecast period. Cloud-based SIS solutions are a cost-effective and efficient way to manage Big Data issues in institutions. The need for strong security, easy deployment, easy maintenance, scalability, improved collaboration and cost efficiency is expected to drive the adoption of cloud-based SIS solutions and services .

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By region, North America to represent the largest market size during the forecast period

North America is expected to hold the largest share of the student information system market. North America is the most mature market in terms of adoption of SIS solutions due to various factors such as the penetration and adoption of innovative technologies, increased competitiveness and the growing need to track student progress and offer services improved accordingly. The presence of most of the leading vendors in the market such as Oracle, Workday, Ellucian, PowerSchool, Jenzabar, Skyward, and Illuminate Education also plays a vital role in the growth of the North American student information system market.

Key players

Main actors of Student Information System Market include Oracle (US), Workday (US), Ellucian (US), PowerSchool (US), Jenzabar (US), Skyward (US), Tribal Group (UK) , Illuminate Education (USA), Arth Infosoft (India) and Focus School Software (USA).

Browse adjacent markets: Software and Services Market Research Reports and advice

Related reports:

Learning management system (LMS) Market by Component (Solutions and Services), Delivery Mode (Distance Learning, Instructor-Led Training, and Blended Learning), Deployment, User Type (Academic and Enterprise), and Region (2022-2026)

ERP for Education Market with Covid-19 Analysis by Component (Software, Services), Deployment Type, End User (K-12, Higher Education), Application (Student Management, Academic Management, Financial and Accounting Management), Region – Global Forecast up to in 2026

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China’s segregated school system hinders migrants https://the-education-store.com/chinas-segregated-school-system-hinders-migrants/ Mon, 02 May 2022 14:03:57 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/chinas-segregated-school-system-hinders-migrants/ When Eli Friedman set out to write his second book, he intended to focus on the segregated education system in China and how it affected the work of teachers, but soon found that the project was moving in an unexpected direction . “When I started talking to teachers about their work, it brought up so […]]]>

When Eli Friedman set out to write his second book, he intended to focus on the segregated education system in China and how it affected the work of teachers, but soon found that the project was moving in an unexpected direction .

“When I started talking to teachers about their work, it brought up so many other issues,” said Friedman, associate professor and chair of international and comparative work at the ILR School. “They talked about the normal workplace concerns about wages and working hours, but also the bigger issues of the wider social environment and the fact that the government was taking all these steps to make their lives extremely difficult – both the teachers and the families they served.

The urbanization of peopleto be published in May by Columbia University Press, reveals how Chinese cities have granted public goods to the privileged while condemning poor and working-class migrants to insecurity, constant mobility and degraded educational opportunities.

“In China, public schools are good schools and private schools are bad,” Friedman said. “For people excluded from public schools, there is a parallel education system – private schools that receive little or no money from the government. They are totally dependent on tuition fees, but they serve a poor population, so they operate under incredibly tight financial constraints.

Using schools as a backdrop, Friedman studies how the state manages the flow of people to the city, often limiting educational opportunities to the children of “migrants” – rural Chinese who move to big cities to better work opportunities. There are now nearly 300 million of these migrants in China who live outside their place of official registration, meaning they may be denied access to social services.

“In 2014, the government set this ‘population limit’ of 23 million for Beijing and basically told local authorities that they had to find ways to get rid of some of the ‘less desirable’ people in the cities,” he said. Friedmann. “And they used all sorts of mechanisms, including relocating labor-intensive industries out of town, demolishing entire informal settlements, but also demolishing or closing schools and making it difficult for the children of people from rural areas to enter public city schools and thus believing, rightly I think, that if the children cannot enter the schools, the parents will have to leave.

Friedman conducted about 250 interviews with teachers and migrants in Beijing, as well as in the city of Guangzhou in the south, the city of Guiyang in the southwest and the city of Chengdu in the west of the country.

Through his research, Friedman discovered that when private schools close, migrant parents find themselves in a precarious situation. If parents are lucky, they may find another neighborhood school to take their children to. The other options are to move elsewhere – which may affect their work – or to send the children back to the rural area to live with the extended family – which has created the phenomenon of almost 60 million “abandoned” children who live without their parents.

“You organize your life in a particular way and you need it to continue that way,” Friedman said. “And if one of the legs of this table falls, then everything can fall apart.”

Friedman’s first book, “The Trap of Insurrection: Labor Politics in Post-Socialist Chinapublished in 2014 explored labor and state relations in China. Through this book, he began to hear the concerns of migrant parents.

“In speaking to many migrant workers for my first project, their biggest concerns were often not what was happening in the workplace, but their children’s schooling,” Friedman said. “If you have children, to stabilize your life, you need a job and enough money to pay the rent, but you also need to feel that your children have a future where you live. So often education was their biggest concern.

“The migrant workers who are the thread that connects these two projects.”

Julie Greco is a communication specialist at the ILR School.

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The Fiji Times » Fiji’s education system is teaching driven – Minister https://the-education-store.com/the-fiji-times-fijis-education-system-is-teaching-driven-minister/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 22:11:52 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/the-fiji-times-fijis-education-system-is-teaching-driven-minister/ Minister for Education, Heritage and the Arts, Premila Kumar, hands over the chairmanship of the Conference of Commonwealth Education Ministers (CCEM) to Professor George Magoha, Cabinet Secretary, Ministry of Education, Kenya. Photo: SUPPLIED The current education system is geared towards teaching as if all children will go to university, Minister for Education, Heritage and the […]]]>

Minister for Education, Heritage and the Arts, Premila Kumar, hands over the chairmanship of the Conference of Commonwealth Education Ministers (CCEM) to Professor George Magoha, Cabinet Secretary, Ministry of Education, Kenya. Photo: SUPPLIED

The current education system is geared towards teaching as if all children will go to university, Minister for Education, Heritage and the Arts Premila Kumar told the 21st Conference of Commonwealth Education Ministers in Nairobi, Kenya.

She said it resulted in a system that was biased against intellectually capable people.

She said there was no room for talented children and to address this the ministry was developing a 10-year education sector plan which would set priorities and strategically engage government resources to develop a more resilient, innovation-driven education sector. , sustainability and employability.

She said the government continues to support 98% of community and faith-based schools with funding and free education grants.

She said this included providing free education from pre-school to secondary schools so that parents and guardians do not have to worry about school fees, bus fares, boat fares, textbooks or fundraising to repair community-owned schools.

She said this included sanitary pads given to girls in grades seven to thirteen and higher education support from the National Toppers and Tertiary Loan Schemes.

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