Education sector – The Education Store http://the-education-store.com/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 13:59:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://the-education-store.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png Education sector – The Education Store http://the-education-store.com/ 32 32 Alberta invests $ 35 million in business accelerators to drive growth in tech sector https://the-education-store.com/alberta-invests-35-million-in-business-accelerators-to-drive-growth-in-tech-sector/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 13:22:12 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/alberta-invests-35-million-in-business-accelerators-to-drive-growth-in-tech-sector/ EDMONTON – Four business accelerators come to Alberta to provide local tech startups with education, mentorship, networking opportunities and access to capital. Maintaining business accelerators is part of the province’s goal of creating 20,000 jobs and increasing tech company revenues to $ 5 billion by 2030. “These accelerators will accelerate the growth of Alberta businesses, […]]]>

EDMONTON –

Four business accelerators come to Alberta to provide local tech startups with education, mentorship, networking opportunities and access to capital.

Maintaining business accelerators is part of the province’s goal of creating 20,000 jobs and increasing tech company revenues to $ 5 billion by 2030.

“These accelerators will accelerate the growth of Alberta businesses, attract investment that creates jobs and diversify the economy,” Doug Schweitzer, Minister of Jobs, Economy and Innovation said in a statement.

A consortium led by Alberta Innovates, called the Alberta Scaleup and Growth Accelerator Program, is spending $ 35 million over three years on accelerators.

500 Global is a venture capital firm that invests in fast growing technology companies. According to the provincial government, its portfolio consists of 33 companies valued at over $ 1 billion and 120 companies valued at over $ 100 million.

The second accelerator, the Alberta Pre-Accelerator, is a partnership between Platform Calgary and Innovate Edmonton. It will offer business support and advice to entrepreneurs, with “special attention” to recruiting coaches and mentors who reflect Alberta’s diversity, according to the government.

The Community Safety and Wellbeing Accelerator is aimed at growing businesses in the community safety and wellbeing space through artificial intelligence and machine learning. The program, through the Alchemist Global Accelerator, will work with the Edmonton Police Foundation.

Plug and Play Alberta’s goal is to address global energy and natural resource challenges by combining ideas from different sectors and countries.

The consortium supporting the accelerators includes not only Schweitzer’s ministry, but also Opportunity Calgary Investment Fund and Prairies Economic Development Canada.

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Education-based research is essential to define the direction of the agricultural sector; said Gardezi https://the-education-store.com/education-based-research-is-essential-to-define-the-direction-of-the-agricultural-sector-said-gardezi/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 13:35:08 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/education-based-research-is-essential-to-define-the-direction-of-the-agricultural-sector-said-gardezi/ RAWALPINDI: Punjab’s Agriculture Minister Syed Hussain Jahania Gardezi said on Monday that education-based research actually plays the most important role in determining the direction of the agricultural sector. Gardezi expressed these views while addressing the audience at the inaugural Silver Jubilee Week session being held here at the University of Arid Agriculture. Mr. Gardezi said […]]]>

RAWALPINDI: Punjab’s Agriculture Minister Syed Hussain Jahania Gardezi said on Monday that education-based research actually plays the most important role in determining the direction of the agricultural sector.

Gardezi expressed these views while addressing the audience at the inaugural Silver Jubilee Week session being held here at the University of Arid Agriculture.

Mr. Gardezi said the 25-year journey of Rawalpindi University of Arid Agriculture is highly commendable.

“The university has rendered invaluable services in the field of agricultural education and research. Graduates from the same university render valuable services in various institutions across the country, ”he added.

The minister said that the University of Arid Agriculture has also been instrumental in bringing hydroponics technology to the country as research projects on high-value crops are underway.

“This will contribute to the modern development of agriculture in the region in the future. The students of this university are involved in the 2021-22 Rabi crop production campaigns including wheat cultivation and, in this regard, educate farmers on the latest Rabi crop production technologies, ”he added. .

Hussain Jahania Gardezi added that unfortunately in the past there was no emphasis on agricultural education and research.

On this occasion, the Vice Chancellor of the University of Arid Agriculture, Rawalpindi, Dr Qamar Zaman said that there are currently six faculties working in this university and the total number of students in this institution is more than 12,000.

Besides agriculture, he added, education is provided in the fields of veterinary medicine, biochemistry and information technology at the university.

He thanked the Minister for attending the Silver Jubilee celebrations. A large number of academics, academics and students attended the Silver Jubilee celebrations at Rawalpindi University of Arid Agriculture.

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PTI government modernizes public sector schools in the province: Momina Basit https://the-education-store.com/pti-government-modernizes-public-sector-schools-in-the-province-momina-basit/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 10:00:19 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/pti-government-modernizes-public-sector-schools-in-the-province-momina-basit/ Faizan Hashmi 9 minutes ago Sat, November 20, 2021 | 3:00 p.m. HAVELIAN, (UrduPoint / Pakistan Point News – November 20, 2021): The Provincial Assembly of Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf, Momina Basit, said the government is prioritizing the modernization of public sector schools in the province, as development in the modern world is the result of the […]]]>

Faizan Hashmi


HAVELIAN, (UrduPoint / Pakistan Point News – November 20, 2021): The Provincial Assembly of Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf, Momina Basit, said the government is prioritizing the modernization of public sector schools in the province, as development in the modern world is the result of the improvement of the educational system.

During her visit to the No.1 Government High School in Havelian, she said the PTI government has focused on the education and health sectors and allocated billions of rupees to upgrade facilities.

Momina Basit said that the government Havelian High School is the main educational institution in Tehsil which has produced a large number of graduates serving in various sectors.

Upon Momina Basit’s arrival, the school principal informed her of the school’s problems and said it was a historic building in need of major repairs, including walls of pregnant.

Former MPA and PTI Abbottabad District Chairman Nisar Safdar, while speaking on the occasion, said that Momina Basit very generously provided huge sums for the reconstruction of the school boundary wall and that it should provide more funds for other school needs.

He said that AMP Momina Basit’s role in the development of Havelian City is commendable and that she would bring more development projects for the city during her tenure.

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Irish aviation sector may need Covid-19 state support next year, officials say https://the-education-store.com/irish-aviation-sector-may-need-covid-19-state-support-next-year-officials-say/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 17:21:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/irish-aviation-sector-may-need-covid-19-state-support-next-year-officials-say/ The Irish aviation sector may need more state support in the event of a pandemic next year after receiving € 521m in such support since the Covid-19 strike as traffic levels are not expected to recover until 2025, government officials predicted in a spending review. An assessment of aviation supports was part of a series […]]]>

The Irish aviation sector may need more state support in the event of a pandemic next year after receiving € 521m in such support since the Covid-19 strike as traffic levels are not expected to recover until 2025, government officials predicted in a spending review.

An assessment of aviation supports was part of a series of reviews released by the Ministry of Public Expenditure on Friday.

It says the sustained growth of the aviation sector in the years leading up to the pandemic came to an abrupt end when the coronavirus response halted travel in March last year, with passenger traffic levels at major airports. Irish having fallen by 78% and 94%. below 2019 levels in 2020 and this year respectively.

“To date, 254 million euros have been provided to the aviation sector in the form of sectoral support, while the sector has also benefited from around 267 million euros in support to ‘horizontal’ and non-horizontal companies. sectoral for [the] to finish [of] June, including wage subsidy programs, ”the journal says.

Officials spoke of the prospect of a “two-lane” recovery in the sector, with Dublin airport recovering strongly and regional airports less strongly.

“In the short term, to continue supporting the sector, it may be necessary for access to horizontal business supports to continue in 2022 and may also require additional future funding under the regional airports program, in particular for Cork. and Shannon. [airports],” they said.

As part of the 2022 budget, funding for the regional airports program has increased from € 21 million to € 36 million to facilitate the temporary inclusion of Cork and Shannon airports in the program.

Subsidies

Since the start of the pandemic, airports in Cork, Shannon, Dublin, Knock, Kerry and Donegal have received four grants totaling 64 million euros. Aer Lingus, the former state-owned airline now part of International Airlines Group, received a credit facility of 150 million euros, while 40 million euros were provided to the airport operator d State DAA in the context of a bond issue.

“The majority of countries have granted advantageous loans with low interest rates and / or state guarantees. On the other hand, Ireland has granted to aeronautical companies a considerable number of non-repayable support in the form of grants ”, indicates the review.

In a separate review, officials called for the rationale for the work-cycle tax regime to be reconsidered and found that no records were available centrally on its operation.

“There are no official figures indicating the costs or the use of the program, and the estimates for the two vary widely,” said the authors of this review. “Although a review of census data indicates an increase in the number of bicycle commuters since the program was introduced, the increase is modest given the reported estimates of program use. “

A third review found that total spending on disability supports and special education increased by € 2.4 billion, or 51%, over the past 10 years until last year for reach 7.1 billion euros. The number of people with access to social protection income support during this period increased by 44% to reach 279,757.

The review indicated that future government policy should allow for greater coordination of disability supports for service users. “This would allow media to be more focused, flexible and have the right combination of activation. “

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Building a truly solid working relationship between Ofsted and the college sector – FE News https://the-education-store.com/building-a-truly-solid-working-relationship-between-ofsted-and-the-college-sector-fe-news/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 07:28:01 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/building-a-truly-solid-working-relationship-between-ofsted-and-the-college-sector-fe-news/ @Ofstednews Chief Inspector Amanda Spielman spoke at # AoCConf21, the Association of Colleges’ annual conference in Birmingham: Hello, it’s great to see you today and it’s fantastic to be here in person in Birmingham – after far too long limited to Teams and Zoom. I would like to start this afternoon with a few thoughts […]]]>

@Ofstednews Chief Inspector Amanda Spielman spoke at # AoCConf21, the Association of Colleges’ annual conference in Birmingham:

Hello, it’s great to see you today and it’s fantastic to be here in person in Birmingham – after far too long limited to Teams and Zoom.

I would like to start this afternoon with a few thoughts on a very eventful year in teaching and a difficult time for colleges. We all talk about “recovery” these days, but that doesn’t mean the challenges are over. I know how much you want to be full-time educators and not part-time COVID managers.

So I want to talk about the road ahead and as part of that I want to explain the role Ofsted will play along the way. I want to talk to you about some of the changes in our work as a result of the expenditure review. And I also want to leave a little time at the end to listen to what you have to say and hopefully answer a few questions.

The impact of the pandemic has been and continues to be the biggest problem for the education sector. It has been an amazing year and I would like to start by saluting the tremendous effort, ingenuity and dedication shown throughout the industry.

And we saw it up close. Although our routine inspections were suspended last year, we have maintained a presence in nurseries, schools and colleges.

Whether it was through researching how the industry was responding to the pandemic, or visiting establishments and speaking directly with executives, we have kept ourselves abreast of developments. And I hope we have also been able to provide a useful and constructive sounding board. When the pressure is on, it is often helpful to discuss ideas and challenges with a sympathetic and knowledgeable stranger.

I would like to thank the colleges for the way you have adjusted and adapted under such difficult circumstances. Colleges quickly embraced distance learning, perhaps because the concept wasn’t new to you. You were able to support students in computer science and internet access; you provided welfare advice and support to help students overcome uncertainty. At the end of the year, you have navigated the delicate waters of exams and assessments for your students and the uncertainty surrounding admissions for this year’s back-to-school year.

I think, and I hope you agree, that there is a very strong working relationship between Ofsted and the college sector; a true collaborative relationship that we have seen at work during the difficult times of the past year. I spoke of the visits that took place while the inspection was suspended. They laid the groundwork for a return to summer monitoring visits, which themselves were the stepping stone to a full inspection this quarter. Throughout, we have spoken with representatives of the college sector. And as we look to the future, this collaborative approach will help us shape inspection as the industry takes on new tasks – which I’ll come back to shortly. be handled with care and appropriately. It was very important for us to listen to your concerns, understand the difficulties you face and make sure that the inspection process takes everything into account. And we had to do this without weakening the rigor of the process, nor undermining the credibility of our judgments. Because the soft-pedal inspection would let down the people we and you really work for – the students. They saw their education forcibly cut short by COVID. And it is the responsibility of the entire education system, including Ofsted, to come together and help this cohort to realize its potential.

Because helping these learners realize their potential has enormous implications not only for individual advancement, but for the recovery, development and success of the country as a whole. It’s hard to overstate the importance of further education for a country emerging from lockdown cycles. It is difficult to stress the importance of upgrading the skills of our workforce as the country forges new economic and trade relations. And it’s hard to overstate, in the wake of COP26, the critical role of colleges in meeting the skills needs of cleaner and greener next generation industries.

With good reason, lifelong learning and skills remain high on the political agenda. In the expenditure review and the budget it was good to see the political recognition supported by new funding, which is a step in the right direction. The Skills Bill marks a new milestone and, as always, implementation will be key. Overall, however, there is no doubt that it is a busy time for continuing education and an exciting time to get involved in colleges.

I spoke about the importance of inspection in today’s climate. I think this is because the inspection not only provides an assessment of education today, it is also a barometer to help predict the weather to come. One of our most important roles is to gather and use evidence to advise ministers on the quality of supply in the sector and the impact of policy initiatives. From T-levels to boot camps – and across the gamut of education recovery, we’ll be gathering evidence to gauge progress. We have planned 2 thematic surveys, on skills training and T levels, but beyond that our inspections provide a mine of data that we are able to question and aggregate.

In the run-up to the expenditure review, we had discussed with the government how we could provide faster and more comprehensive education assurance throughout this critical period of recovery. The government, like us, wants to speed up our inspection cycles – so we can reduce the time it takes to inspect every school and college across England.

For Colleges, Sixth Year Colleges and Specially Designated Institutes, we have secured confirmation of funding that will allow us to reach each institution by 2025. In this cycle, we will not be undertaking brief inspections. – so every college, sixth-year college and SDI [specialist designated institution] will undergo a full inspection between next September and summer 2025. I am convinced that this is a positive development and one that will be welcomed by the industry. It follows discussions with the DfE on how the inspection can respond to the focus on local skill needs.

I am in favor of evaluating the extent to which colleges take into account local skills. We have had concerns about the discrepancies in the past between courses that are popular and courses that really open doors. There is a moral imperative here on two fronts – both to help the economy thrive and to present students with realistic paths. It is really important that we have a real idea of ​​the local economy so that we can properly consider the contribution of the colleges. This work clearly does not lend itself to light touch inspection. We need full inspections, with some improvements, which I am glad the government has recognized.

I would add that we are already starting to pilot our methodologies for inspecting skills needs, and we will seek your advice. This is part of the value of our collaborative relationship with the EF sector.

These changes in the way we inspect colleges will obviously provide greater assurance to the industry as a whole. I hope you will also benefit from our curriculum-based approach and the professional dialogue between college leaders and inspectors. This dialogue is not only at the heart of the evaluation process, it also highlights opportunities for improvement and progress. The response to inspections under the new framework was very positive before COVID and the rest today – because of the dialogue that is at its heart.

We were convinced that the FEI was flexible enough to adapt to the current situation. We did a lot of pilot projects this past quarter and we are now seeing the results in colleges (and schools too). We talk to leaders about the impact of COVID in their colleges; we discuss the adaptations and adjustments that colleges have made, and it helps us understand what success looks like in each individual context.

The first reports of this quarter’s inspections are now starting to be published and they are certainly not alarming. You continue to perform well and get recognized for doing it.

This mandate, we are also starting to inspect previously exceptional institutions now that the exemption has been lifted. I was very open about what that would mean. Since 2012, we have a one-way valve attached to the exceptional quality. Thus, for a decade, we have accumulated exceptional institutions without reassessment. As inspectors return to colleges declared exceptional many years ago, they will inevitably find that some are now slowing down. But we are starting to see others rise through the ranks. And I am also confident that many outstanding colleges will have maintained their standards over the years and during the pandemic.

In fact, the first published report of our September inspections was from Sixth Form College Farnborough. Academy converter, its predecessor was inspected in 2007 and proved to be exceptional. Fourteen years later, he has maintained the best mark.

There are many siren voices that describe the education industry in the darkest terms. There is no doubt that the pandemic has hurt the education of millions of young people – and it continues to present serious challenges to staff working in our schools and colleges. But as we came back to a full inspection this quarter, we didn’t see a kneeling sector. Far from there. There is a resilience and a determination that we recognize and that should be nurtured. I want to thank all of you for the work you do and the huge difference you are making for individuals and communities across the country.

Amanda Spielman, Chief Inspector, Ofsted

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General Paul Nakasone emphasizes need for deeper cross-sectoral collaboration against cyber threats https://the-education-store.com/general-paul-nakasone-emphasizes-need-for-deeper-cross-sectoral-collaboration-against-cyber-threats/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 21:32:25 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/general-paul-nakasone-emphasizes-need-for-deeper-cross-sectoral-collaboration-against-cyber-threats/ Gen. Paul Nakasone, head of US Cyber ​​Command and five-time Wash100 award recipient, said the US government should further strengthen partnerships with businesses and universities in the face of evolving cyber threats and strategic challenges facing the country is facing, Nextgov reported Wednesday. Nakasone, who is also director of the National Security Agency, said the […]]]>

Gen. Paul Nakasone, head of US Cyber ​​Command and five-time Wash100 award recipient, said the US government should further strengthen partnerships with businesses and universities in the face of evolving cyber threats and strategic challenges facing the country is facing, Nextgov reported Wednesday.

Nakasone, who is also director of the National Security Agency, said the NSA is advancing its efforts to counter cyberthreats by working with more than 100 defense industry base companies and their security providers through the Cybersecurity Collaboration Center and has contracts with more than 1,800 companies and academic institutions.

“The technology, services and products delivered through these partnerships underpin all of our operations and provide strong security to our country,” added Nakasone. He also mentioned the NSA’s partnership with the National Cryptologic Foundation.

“The NCF will create opportunities for the public and private sectors to engage on cybersecurity and national security issues,” Nakasone said. “It’s a force multiplier for us, and in particular for our ability to improve cybersecurity education across the country. “

Nakasone also discussed the impact of China and other nation states on U.S. national security through disinformation and disruptive operations.

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Industry’s first and most comprehensive mid-sector cybersecurity research study finds 490% increase in likelihood of breach by end of 2021 https://the-education-store.com/industrys-first-and-most-comprehensive-mid-sector-cybersecurity-research-study-finds-490-increase-in-likelihood-of-breach-by-end-of-2021/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/industrys-first-and-most-comprehensive-mid-sector-cybersecurity-research-study-finds-490-increase-in-likelihood-of-breach-by-end-of-2021/ In response to market failure to provide security solutions for midsize businesses, cybersecurity innovator Coro introduces industry-first funding program to make all-in-one enterprise-grade cyber protection immediately accessible to all growing companies NEW YORK, November 18, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Coro, the all-in-one cybersecurity platform designed for mid-size businesses, growing businesses and lean IT teams, today […]]]>

In response to market failure to provide security solutions for midsize businesses, cybersecurity innovator Coro introduces industry-first funding program to make all-in-one enterprise-grade cyber protection immediately accessible to all growing companies

NEW YORK, November 18, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Coro, the all-in-one cybersecurity platform designed for mid-size businesses, growing businesses and lean IT teams, today released an in-depth cybersecurity research report revealing a true market failure: a serious lack of preparedness in the mid-market sector, which includes companies with between 100 and 1,500 employees, to defend against a growing array of cyber attacks. The pandemic-induced digital transformation, including remote working, the proliferation of devices, and the increased use of cloud applications, has fueled the rapid emergence of a range of attack types far wider than anything else. has been seen before the pandemic, including malware and ransomware attacks through cloud apps and email. , endpoint malware, Wi-Fi phishing, and insider threats. The results of the report show that midsize businesses are largely unprotected due to the fact that they lack the immense team resources, expensive products and the expertise to protect against these growing attacks because The cybersecurity market has evolved primarily to serve large enterprises – and yet the mid-market sector is affected by cyber attacks with a frequency and sophistication comparable to large enterprises.

“While we have seen more far-reaching protection developed for large enterprises, the cybersecurity industry is not prioritizing the needs of the middle market. Now, growing businesses remain fully exposed to truly unprecedented levels of cyberattacks, which are rapidly increasing not only in volume and sophistication, but also in reach and lethality, ”said Guy Moskowitz, CEO of Coro. “The market has failed to protect these critical businesses, and Coro is addressing this issue by providing comprehensive, enterprise-grade cybersecurity protection, priced and designed specifically for midsize businesses. “

The research report is based on examining more than 4,000 mid-sized companies across retail, manufacturing, professional services, healthcare, transportation, and education. The results show that the intermediate sector is not equipped to cope with the current cyber climate:

  • The vast majority of midsize businesses are in the dark when it comes to detecting attacks and completely helpless when it comes to fending off them. Email malware attacks increased 154% between 2020 and 2021, but only 1% of midsize businesses implemented email malware protection in 2021 – 88% of them having incorrectly configured protection settings. The numbers are even worse for lesser-known attacks like Wi-Fi phishing, which increased 203%: less than 1% of midsize businesses have some type of Wi-Fi phishing protection in place, and those with misconfiguration rate 90%.

  • The number of attacks on mid-sized businesses across all industries increased by at least 50% between 2020 and 2021. Healthcare and transportation stand out as the fastest growing sectors, with attacks increasing by more than 125% between 2020 and 2021. Attacks in retail, manufacturing and professional services have almost increased. doubled, increasing between 86% and 90%. These increases demonstrate a broad shift, as this caliber and volume of attacks previously primarily targeted large enterprises, but are now launched at mid-sized enterprises.

  • Targeted and personalized attacks quadrupled, while insider threats doubled. In 2021, the proportion of naive attacks – the least sophisticated type of attack – increased from 86% to 68%, while personalized attacks and insider threats – the two deadliest and most damaging targeted attacks – are multiplied by 4 and 2 respectively, revealing the ability of bad actors to deploy smarter attacks against a wider range of organizations.

  • Mid-sized businesses are at least 490% likely to experience a security breach by the end of 2021 than they were in 2019. The growth of cyber attacks and the increase in threat vectors targeting midsize businesses since the onset of the pandemic, combined with the security industry’s failure to deliver viable security solutions tailored to the mid-market sector and with the widespread misconfiguration of a few the security solutions that have been deployed have resulted in an alarming increase in the likelihood of suffering a devastating breach.

In light of the report’s findings, Coro is committed to providing tools and financial programming to make enterprise-level cyber protection accessible to midsize businesses. To that end, Coro unveiled its new Easy Upgrade program, a one-of-a-kind cybersecurity funding program. The new initiative offers financing options that allow companies currently stuck in contracts with legacy security solutions to immediately upgrade to Coro’s all-in-one platform at no upfront cost, without requiring additional budget.

Coro also showcased its next-generation all-in-one cybersecurity platform. With a new user interface, faster setup, extended functionality and AI automation, the next-generation Coro platform delivers comprehensive security across all endpoints, protecting users, cloud applications, emails, devices and data. The platform is built on the premise of non-disruptive security and leverages AI and machine learning to automatically find and fix the most well-known cyberthreats and vulnerabilities. Coro saves lean IT teams time, energy and resources by only solving problems that require human intervention.

“Our next-generation platform is our response to a significant hole in today’s market – a holistic, affordable security tool that offers maximum protection with minimum involvement. We’ve removed the extra steps, and there are no logs to review and no need to balance multiple tools and integrate disparate systems, ”said Carmel Domshlak, co-founder and chief scientist at Coro. “Everything is in one place here, and Coro AI anticipates the risk to take care of the majority of issues without IT ever having to intervene.”

“Coro provides our organization, and by default the communities we serve, the comprehensive protection and real-time alerts we need to defend against cybersecurity threats,” said Eddie Drachenberg Jr., CIO at O ‘Neill Healthcare. “With Coro, I had the confidence and the ability to continuously train our employees on the correct methods of email encryption, including PHI / PII / PCI data, by leveraging its DLP alerts and reports. I was pleasantly surprised to find that Coro not only alerts against phishing and ransomware email threats, but also allows me to create rules to prevent further attacks. Coro has proven to be a big step in the right direction for O’Neill Healthcare’s cybersecurity needs.

Coro has experienced 300% year-over-year growth in each of the past three years, and has also recently expanded its consulting business, now joined by Barmak Meftah, former CEO of AlienVault, and alumni. AlienVault senior executives Roger Thornton and Russell Spitler.

“Mid-sized and growing businesses clearly bear the brunt of cybersecurity attacks, yet many do not have the budget or the expertise to completely secure their assets, relying on outdated out-of-the-box solutions. and incomplete or fragmented security policies, ”said Barmak Meftah, former CEO of AlienVault. “Step into Coro, the only cybersecurity solution on the market that broke through the price, complexity and IT resource barriers that nearly all midsize businesses face, with an all-in-one platform that discovers and automatically address the vast majority of cyber threats.

To access the full research report, please visit https://go.coro.net/2021-mid-market-security-report.

About Coro
Coro is one of the fastest growing mid-market security solutions, offering all-in-one protection that enables organizations to defend against malware, ransomware, phishing, and web bots. devices, users and cloud applications. Built on the principle of uninterrupted security, more than 5,000 businesses depend on Coro for comprehensive security protection, unmatched ease of use and unmatched affordability. The Coro platform uses innovative AI technology to identify and address the many security threats that today’s distributed businesses face, without IT teams having to worry, investigate, or resolve. even the problems. Investors in Coro include JPV, MizMaa Ventures and Ashton Kutcher’s Sound Ventures. For more information, please visit coro.net.

CONTACT: Media Contact: Kelsey Bates Scratch Marketing + Media for Coro kelsey@scratchmm.com
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These are the most in-demand jobs in South Africa’s tech sector – here’s what you’ll need to find them https://the-education-store.com/these-are-the-most-in-demand-jobs-in-south-africas-tech-sector-heres-what-youll-need-to-find-them/ Thu, 18 Nov 2021 04:32:56 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/these-are-the-most-in-demand-jobs-in-south-africas-tech-sector-heres-what-youll-need-to-find-them/ (Getty Images) The Covid-19 pandemic has had a negative impact on most businesses, but those in the tech sector are booming. Information and communications technology (ICT), financial services and FinTech companies are scaling up their operations as other companies go digital. This has created an increase in the demand for IT workers. Some of the […]]]>

(Getty Images)

  • The Covid-19 pandemic has had a negative impact on most businesses, but those in the tech sector are booming.
  • Information and communications technology (ICT), financial services and FinTech companies are scaling up their operations as other companies go digital.
  • This has created an increase in the demand for IT workers.
  • Some of the most in-demand positions are in cloud computing, artificial intelligence, machine learning, data analytics, and cybersecurity.
  • For more stories, visit www.BusinessInsider.co.za.

South Africa’s tech sector is booming as more companies go digital in a trend that has been accelerated by the Covid-19 pandemic. This promises well-paying job opportunities, but only for those with the right skills and experience.

While few industries have been untouched by the pandemic, tech companies, from e-commerce companies to cybersecurity companies, have exploded. The Covid-19 pandemic, with its lockdowns and work-from-home instructions, has catapulted digital systems to the fore and forced brick-and-mortar businesses to reassess themselves.

These companies have been rushing to set up digital systems, whether for selling online or enabling remote working, while others already in the tech space are expanding their operations. This has created a strong demand for IT workers, especially among information and communication technology (ICT), financial services and FinTech companies, according to Michael Page, a leading recruiting firm.

” The multinationals [multinational corporations] in ICT and FinTech, and some companies like TakeALot.com and Jumia in the retail industry see technology as a catalyst for their business, and it is these companies that will remain desirable employers for top IT talent ” , says Robyn Stainbank, senior technology consultant for Michael Page in Africa.

A career in tech, besides being in demand, is lucrative, according to Michael Page’s latest Market Overview and Hiring Insights Guide for 2022.

According to the report released earlier in November, average annual salaries range from Rand 350,000 (about Rand 29,000 per month) for a network engineer in a small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) up to Rand 3 million (Rand 250,000. per month) for an IT director (CIO) of a multinational.

Cloud computing, which enables the remote delivery and hosting of data storage, servers, databases, networks and software, is in particular demand, according to Page.

The employees best equipped to take advantage of this demand and find employment in cloud computing should have skills and experience in Amazon Web Services (AWS), Azure, DevOps, Docker, and Kubernetes.

“DevOps is a hybrid role that combines software development, operations and quality assurance. Similar IT roles that can combine IT with other critical business skills are needed, ”says Stainbank.

Positions in artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, software development, data science and cybersecurity are also in high demand.

“Businesses are going beyond just reporting on data and management information to also using the data for insight, which is essentially the commercialization of that data,” notes Michael’s latest Market Overview and Hiring Insights Guide. Page.

“Companies are developing their capabilities to make more data-driven decisions, and therefore the demand for talent with data-related expertise. “

Cybersecurity, which ensures that systems connected to the Internet are safe and secure, is also a priority for businesses that have had to adapt to remote working. And as employees begin to return to offices, hybrid work models will likely be part of the new normal, coinciding with cybercriminals upping the stakes.

“With more and more people working from home, cloud networks are becoming security targets. Cyber ​​security is a critical issue and companies prioritize recruiting talent with the expertise to put in place safeguards, ”Page explains.

Stainbank adds that to fully meet current and future demand in this sector, science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education must be a priority in South Africa.

“Greater efforts must be made to modernize and develop sustainable education programs with an emphasis on innovation, science and technology,” Stainbank said.

(Compiled by Luke Daniel)

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New York aims to launch commercial waste zones in 2022, industry’s biggest change in decades https://the-education-store.com/new-york-aims-to-launch-commercial-waste-zones-in-2022-industrys-biggest-change-in-decades/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 17:11:15 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/new-york-aims-to-launch-commercial-waste-zones-in-2022-industrys-biggest-change-in-decades/ Dive brief: The New York City Department of Sanitation (DSNY) on Tuesday released the final part of a request for proposals, launching a timeline to finalize contracts for 20 non-proprietary commercial waste zones and a container service to the city-wide starting next summer. Customer transitions in some areas could start by the end of next […]]]>

Dive brief:

  • The New York City Department of Sanitation (DSNY) on Tuesday released the final part of a request for proposals, launching a timeline to finalize contracts for 20 non-proprietary commercial waste zones and a container service to the city-wide starting next summer. Customer transitions in some areas could start by the end of next year, with final implementation likely complete by 2024.
  • DSNY qualified 50 bidders to submit final proposals by March 17, based on an initial tender earlier this year. Waste Management, Waste Connections, Action Environmental Services (a subsidiary of IWS), Winters Bros. Waste Systems and a series of other local players will be vying for 10-year contracts that could be extended until 2042.
  • At the same time, DSNY recently finalized the rules governing security, customer service and third-party waste audits for the system. The agency also announced the launch of a Commercial Waste Safety Working Group, made up of members such as the Solid Waste Association of North America (SWANA) and the Teamsters, whose first meeting is scheduled for December.

Dive overview:

Almost two years after Mayor Bill de Blasio signed a law to establish commercial waste zones, which followed many years of fierce advocacy and debate, the outgoing administration has taken a crucial step in bringing the one of the biggest changes to the city’s waste industry in decades.

While the city was originally aiming to start implementation this year, the pandemic resulted in multiple delays as well as temporary budget constraints at the DSNY that slowed the process. Continuing uncertainty about the pace of economic recovery in New York has led some carriers and business groups to call for further discussions, but the actions taken by DSNY this week are a clear sign that implementation is moving forward.

In a hearing of the New York City Council Sanitation Committee on Tuesday, Deputy Commissioner for Policy and External Affairs Gregory Anderson described the already extended deadline as appropriate.

“I think so [was] important that we take the time to do it right and understand the impact that COVID-19 had on the commercial waste industry and sort of allows them to get back on their feet before continuing, ”he said, stressing the importance of moving to a program that“ will shape the future of this industry over the next decades ”.

DSNY plans to award up to 65 contracts; each of the 20 zones can have up to three carriers and five city-wide contracts will be available for containerized waste. Companies can service a maximum of 15 zones, plus a city-wide contract. Currently, New York has an open market system where businesses can serve customers anywhere in the five boroughs as long as they retain a municipal license.

Depending on how the process unfolds, the local market could see new or returning players (Winters Bros. and Waste Management), the consolidation of large existing positions (Waste Connections and Action) and a range of results for many other local carriers from long time. Some companies are also making plans for one-time joint ventures or subcontracting arrangements as part of their offerings.

The National Association for Waste and Recycling said members and local carriers are still evaluating the glut of new information, but other initial reactions indicate this was generally what the industry expected.

“Carters should be happy with the final audit rules, which are much less onerous than what was originally proposed,” said SWANA CEO David Biderman, describing the removal of a proposed requirement for carriers. to reimburse the cost of third party waste from their customers. checks. “The industry and others opposed it, and the department wisely revised it. “

Supporters hope the new system can increase recovery rates for recyclables and organics, while limiting the number of kilometers vehicles travel through a more efficient route by zone. According to the RFP, DSNY “strongly prefers” that the prices offered for the collection of recyclable and organic materials are at least 30% lower than those for solid waste. The criteria for judging bids are made up of 35% on the basis of price, 35% on technical plans and 30% on the capacity of a bidder to provide the service and its operational history.

Currently, carriers are subject to a price cap set by the Business Integrity Commission – a holdover from New York’s crackdown on organized crime in the 1990s – but that rate has not increased for several years, despite demands by industry. Carriers that win zonal contracts will still operate under a new “maximum price”, but their contracts will have the option of automatically increasing annual fares.

Council member Antonio Reynoso, main sponsor of the waste zone bill and outgoing chair of the sanitation committee, told the hearing he was optimistic prices would not go up for customers, but “the pandemic concerns me and I don’t know if we’re going to get prices that we may have to lock in for a long time, which are more of the timing than the norm.” “

Anderson of DSNY said that carters and customers will be able to negotiate within the maximum price and that “there is always a level of competition in the system.” The agency also noted plans to engage closely with customers as they potentially see new carriers and different requirements in the years to come.

Biderman said the implementation period would present challenges for everyone involved and that an increase in the current tariff cap was “overdue.” He noted that higher rates under the zoning system are likely, adding that “it may well cost a little more to have your waste removed safely and in an environmentally friendly manner.”

The largest public companies in the North American industry, including Waste Management and Waste Connections, all indicated that price increases were a key strategy to offset inflationary pressures in the latest round of quarterly earnings calls.

Another area to watch, among many others, is that of the types of forward-looking investments proposed by bidders. DSNY is looking to see fleets with at least 50% “zero emission vehicles” by 2030, as well as new or expanded processing capacity for recyclables and organics. While local industry has made recent investments in these areas, zoning proponents say much more work is needed.

“In addition to negotiating aggressively with waste management companies, to ensure that they build the right facilities and invest heavily in customer education, we urge the city and the sanitation department to continue to seek solutions. ways to ensure that independent waste and expert auditors are available to every business client, ”said Justin Wood, director of policy at New York Lawyers for the Public Interest, during the hearing.

While a handful of companies have extensive experience with municipal tenders, many local carriers do not and some hire industry consultants. DSNY has scheduled meetings on December 8 and January 11 for bidders to ask questions before submitting proposals that could lock in the fate of some of their companies for years to come.

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News from the 2nd and the State – Government, public sector https://the-education-store.com/news-from-the-2nd-and-the-state-government-public-sector/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 06:52:05 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/news-from-the-2nd-and-the-state-government-public-sector/ Weekly wrap It was the last week the House of Representatives and Senate sat together until the week of December 13. This meant a flurry of activity across the Capitol throughout the three-day session. Monday was highlighted by the House of Commons Environmental Resources and Energy Committee which reported on concurrent SCRRR Resolution # 1 […]]]>

Weekly wrap

It was the last week the House of Representatives and Senate sat together until the week of December 13. This meant a flurry of activity across the Capitol throughout the three-day session.

Monday was highlighted by the House of Commons Environmental Resources and Energy Committee which reported on concurrent SCRRR Resolution # 1 (Yaw, R-Lycoming), which would disapprove of EQB By-law # 7-559 : CO2 Budget Exchange Program (RGGI). The Committee also held a briefing on the economic implications of Pennsylvania’s passage of California’s Large Truck Diesel Emission Control Regulations.

In addition, the House Commerce Committee held a public hearing on Executive Order 2021-06: Worker Protection and Investment, while the House Education Committee held a briefing on learning loss. The House State Government Committee reported on HB 1482 (Cutler, R-Lancaster), which would require the state and every county to implement a post-election audit.

On the Senate side, the Education Committee reported: HB 1660 (Sonney, R-Erie), which would limit the temporary emergency powers of a four-year school district to 60 days; and SB 937 (Brooks, R-Mercer), which would ban COVID-19 vaccine warrants for children. Likewise, the Senate Health and Social Services Committee reported on SB 471 (Mastriano, R-Adams), which would ban forcing people to be vaccinated against COVID-19. The Committee also reported on HB 220 (Rader, R-Monroe), which would prohibit drug and alcohol treatment facilities from refusing treatment to an individual solely on the basis of a negative drug test. .

The full Senate passed SR 53 (Baker, R-Luzerne), which directs the Legislative Committee on Budget and Finance to conduct a study and report on the funding of road maintenance by the Department of Transport . The House passed HR 148 (White, R-Philadelphia), which urges the Environmental Protection Agency to revise the national standard on renewable fuels.

In addition, the following two bills have been sent to the Senate for consideration: HB 1041 (Topper, R-Bedford), which would require school districts and career and technical centers to allow homeschool students to enroll in extracurricular activities and take up to four courses; and HB 1443 (Hershey, R-Juniata), which would provide advertisements for laboratory tests.

On Tuesday, the House transport committee reported on SB 382 (Langerholc, R-Cambria), which would reform the status of the public-private transport partnership (P3) and cancel the Pathways Major Bridge P3 program. The House finance committee reported on HB 2058 (Mako, R-Northampton), which would ensure that the deadline for filing local income tax returns on earned income and net profits is in line with that of the personal income tax and federal income tax returns.

The State Government Senate Committee reported on SB 812 (Phillips-Hill, R-York), which would require those evaluating bids for transportation contracts to consider “draft order of modification ”. In addition, the Senate Committee on Aging and Youth reported on two bills: HB 291 (Labs, R-Bucks), which would extend the Social Security cost of living (COLA) adjustment moratorium two additional years, until December 31. , 2023; and HB 1260 (Thomas, R-Bucks), which would expand the income limits for the PACENET program, eliminate the “clawback” of the PACENET premium and allow the Department of Aging to require PACE and PACENET registrants to register for the PACENET premium. Medicare Part D.

SB 706 (Robinson, R-Allegheny) was flagged by the Senate Supply Committee. The bill would establish the Max Manufacturing Initiative Fund to support or facilitate the following: (1) industrial processes, mining, manufacturing, productive agriculture, information technology and biotechnology; (2) the acquisition, installation, modernization or modernization of existing machines and installations; and (3) serve as a medical, industrial or technological facility.

In addition, the Senate Health and Human Services Committee reported on SB 938 (Brooks, R-Mercer), which would give the Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs the power to enact certain regulations that affect licensed drug and alcohol treatment providers.

The House eventually passed two bills that will now be considered by the Senate: HB 1561 (Farry, R-Bucks) and HB 1563 (Cutler, R-Lancaster), which would provide access to certain information for health care purposes. . operations, treatment and payment for mental health services. A bill has passed in the Senate and will make it to the House: it is for federal tax purposes.

On Wednesday, the last sitting day of the week, the House Consumer Committee held a joint public hearing with the Senate Rural Broadband Communications and Technology Committee. A voting meeting followed, where the committee reported on HB 2071 (Causer, R-McKean), which would establish the Pennsylvania Broadband Development Authority to effect and disburse grants and develop a broadband plan to scale of State.

The House Transportation Committee reported on HR 152 (Brown, R-Monroe), which urges the federal government and the governor to take action to address the nationwide shortage of school bus drivers. In addition, the House Commerce Committee held a public hearing on HB 2057 (Roae, R-Crawford), which would make numerous changes to the Companies Act. The committee will hold a voting meeting on the bill on Wednesday.

Finally, the following two bills were finally passed in the Senate and will now be considered by the House: and SB 915 (Browne, R-Lehigh), which is the Capital Budget Project Itemization Act for fiscal year 2021-2022.

The coming week

Just the House is in session next week, giving the Senate an early start to the Thanksgiving holiday.

On Monday, the House Labor and Industry Committee will hold a public hearing on the reform of public sector unions. Next, the House Professional Licensure Committee will review SB 869 (Tomlinson, R-Bucks), which would allow the licensing boards and commissions of the Bureau of Professional and Occupational Affairs to permanently maintain certain exemptions and measures put in place during COVID. -19.

In addition, the House Education Committee will review: HB 465 (Boback, R-Luzerne), which would require schools to test for lead contamination in drinking water; and HB 2045 (Ortitay, R-Allegheny), which would create a statewide early literacy program.

The House Environmental Resources and Energy Committee will hold a voting meeting to report: HB 2075 (Knowles, R-Schuylkill), which would repeal Pennsylvania’s heavy-duty diesel emissions control program and enforce the federal standards for heavy diesel vehicles and engines; and HR 149 (Rigby, R-Cambria), which would ask the Legislative Committee on Budget and Finance to study the potential impacts of the revisions proposed by the Department of Environmental Protection for biosolids permits.

On Tuesday, the House State Government Committee will consider two bills that would amend the state constitution. First, HB 2069 (Cutler, R-Lancaster), which provides that any decree or proclamation issued by the governor cannot be in effect for more than 21 days, unless extended by a simultaneous resolution of the General Assembly . Second, HB 2070 (Cutler, R-Lancaster), which would exempt disapproval of a regulation by the General Assembly from the requirement of presentation for governor’s approval or disapproval.

The House Health Committee has a busy agenda and is expected to vote on:

  • HB 1005 (Cox, R-Berks), which would add information to the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (ABC-MAP) when Narcan / Naloxone is used by emergency responders or healthcare professionals;
  • HB 1644 (Struzzi, R-Indiana), which would direct the Department of Human Services to develop a statewide process to place Medicaid patients with behavioral health or other long-term care needs in appropriate and timely care facilities;
  • HB 1959 (Pennycuick R-Montgomery), which would authorize the clinical study of the efficacy and cost / benefit optimization of psilocybin-assisted therapy;
  • HB 2013 (Diamond, R-Lebanon), which would amend the State Constitution to provide for the right of an individual to refuse any medical procedure, treatment, injection, vaccine or prophylactic; and
  • HB 2033 (Lawrence, R-Chester), which would extend the state lab COVID-19 testing status report requirement until December 31, 2022.

To wrap up the week on Wednesday, the Senate Environmental Resources and Energy Committee will hold a public hearing on the Philadelphia Energy Solutions refinery site and cleanup efforts. The House transport committee will hold a public hearing on supply chain issues. Finally, the House Aging and Older Adult Services Committee will review SB 729 (Ward, R-Blair) which would allow the delivery of resident abuse training programs for nurse aides.

The full list of committee meetings is available here:

lodge

Senate

In other news

  • Governor Wolf announced the approval of nearly $ 36 million for 220 community revitalization projects under the Neighborhood Assistance Program.
  • The acting secretary of state has given notice of a statewide recount in the race for Commonwealth Court. Stacy Wallace (R) won one of the open seats. Lori Dumas (R) and Drew Crompton (R), second and third, respectively, have a total of votes in the half-percent range that triggers a mandatory recount under state law.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide on the subject. Specialist advice should be sought regarding your particular situation.

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