Education sector – The Education Store http://the-education-store.com/ Wed, 18 May 2022 03:56:13 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://the-education-store.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png Education sector – The Education Store http://the-education-store.com/ 32 32 FDC Educator Kylie looks back on 13 years in the industry https://the-education-store.com/fdc-educator-kylie-looks-back-on-13-years-in-the-industry/ Wed, 18 May 2022 01:19:55 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/fdc-educator-kylie-looks-back-on-13-years-in-the-industry/ Family Child Care Educator (FDC) Kylie has worked in the early childhood education and care sector in Hobart for 13 years and recently shared some thoughts on her experience with Unite Vic/Tas. An excerpt from his experiences appears below. Having started her professional life in retail, Kylie soon realized that was not her true calling […]]]>

Family Child Care Educator (FDC) Kylie has worked in the early childhood education and care sector in Hobart for 13 years and recently shared some thoughts on her experience with Unite Vic/Tas. An excerpt from his experiences appears below.

Having started her professional life in retail, Kylie soon realized that was not her true calling and decided to investigate working with children, something she had always wanted to do.

The flexibility of working in an FDC environment also appealed to Kylie, whoo is a mother of two children, with one child who has additional needs.

Being an FDC educator, she said, allows her the flexibility to raise her children while working and to be accessible to her daughter when needed.

For her daughter, growing up in an environment surrounded by other children has helped her become more social, and caring for up to seven children at a time has allowed Kylie to bond closely with those she cares about. ‘to keep busy.

“It’s actually like a family,” she said. “We drive down the driveway and they call it home.”

Reflecting on Uniting’s role as coordinator of her FDC program, Kylie said her experience was different from those she had previously with other providers.

“The union in general is more for families,” she said, “not just in terms of family child care, but it will help families who need help in more ways than one. “

For those considering a role in the FDC sector, Kylie has the following advice.

“Becoming an educator is not as difficult as one might think. A phone call was enough to start the process.

“You think you are alone because you are an educator at home, but you are not. You actually have a lot of support around you, I love that. I can’t see myself doing anything else now.

For more information on Uniting Vic/Tas, please see here.

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Hutterite women take their first steps into the health sector https://the-education-store.com/hutterite-women-take-their-first-steps-into-the-health-sector/ Mon, 16 May 2022 11:49:42 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/hutterite-women-take-their-first-steps-into-the-health-sector/ Growing up, Karissa Maendel never dreamed of being a nurse. But when she had the chance to embark on such a career, she knew she had to take it. “It hadn’t been an option, but the opportunity came up,” says Maendel, now in her first year as a registered nurse. “It seemed like too good […]]]>



Growing up, Karissa Maendel never dreamed of being a nurse. But when she had the chance to embark on such a career, she knew she had to take it.

“It hadn’t been an option, but the opportunity came up,” says Maendel, now in her first year as a registered nurse. “It seemed like too good an opportunity to pass up.”

A visionary change in a Hutterite colony in Manitoba made his new calling possible.

Maendel is one of the few Hutterite nurses in the province. Now she is trying to encourage greater representation within the healthcare system to help settlements and ease staffing shortages.

“I know that part of the solution to this problem is the resources that the Hutterite community can provide,” Maendel says.


MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Judith Maendel (left) and her sister-in-law Karissa Maendel at the Baker Colony in Winnipeg. They work 12-hour shifts a few days a week at the hospital and continue to cook, garden and work at the colony in their free time.

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MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS

Judith Maendel (left) and her sister-in-law Karissa Maendel at Baker Colony in Winnipeg. They work 12-hour shifts a few days a week at the hospital and continue to cook, garden and work at the colony in their free time.

With support from the Baker Colony, the 37-year-old mother enrolled in a three-year bachelor of science in nursing program at the Portage la Prairie campus of Red River College Polytechnic in 2018 and graduated with honors earlier. this year – in time to join the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic.

She now works part-time in the pediatric medical unit at Portage la Prairie Hospital alongside her sister-in-law, Judith Maendel, one of the first four Hutterite women to become nurses in Manitoba.

Baker Colony, located about 50 kilometers southwest of Portage, is home to 120 people and has found it necessary to encourage its members to join the profession, thanks in part to its longtime leader, the late Reverend Ben Maendel.

Traditionally, Hutterites did not seek employment outside the colony and had no individual income. Members work inside the colony as a collective and pool resources for farming, manufacturing, and other economic operations. For decades, Hutterites have received teaching credentials and also receive certification to work in the trades, as accountants and some as first responders.

Registered nurses in Hutterite communities are still rare.

The income that Karissa and Judith receive as nurses goes back to the colony. They work 12-hour shifts a few days a week at the hospital and continue to cook, garden and work at the colony in their free time.




<p>MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p>
<p>Judith Maendel (left) and her sister-in-law Karissa Maendel at the Baker Colony in Winnipeg.  Both are trying to encourage greater Hutterian representation within the health care system to help the colonies and alleviate staffing shortages in the province.</p>
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<p>MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p>
<p>Judith Maendel (left) and her sister-in-law Karissa Maendel at Baker Colony in Winnipeg.  Both are trying to encourage greater Hutterite representation within the health care system to help the colonies and alleviate staffing shortages in the province.</p>
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<p>They are both informally on-call in the community to provide basic care (such as changing dressings) and have the assessment skills to recognize when a trip to the emergency room is needed.			</p>
<p>There were no other Hutterite nurse role models Judith could look up to when she enrolled in Brandon University’s four-year nursing program in 2009, but she comes from a long line. pioneering women.  Her aunts at Fairholme Colony, near Portage, were the first Hutterite women to be trained as teachers, she says.			</p>
<p>“They strongly advocated for education and to have more of these professions in our community,” she says, adding that Ben Maendel supported the cause.			</p>
<p>Judith describes him as a “visionary leader”.  Thanks to her training, she was able to provide him with palliative care before his death in 2018, so that he could be at home rather than in the hospital.			</p>
<p>“At the end of his life, it was very significant,” says Judith.  “My role as a Hutterite nurse made sense, even in the midst of this tragedy.”			</p>
<p>Both women say they would not have ventured into nursing without the support of their community, and they hope more colonies will follow.  Manitoba’s Hutterite population is approximately 10,000.			</p>
<figure class=



<p>MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p>
<p>Judith Maendel shows a selfie of herself during her nursing shift on her phone at the Baker Colony in Winnipeg.  She is one of a handful of Hutterite nurses in the province.</p>
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						</a>						
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<p>MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p>
<p>Judith Maendel shows a selfie of herself during her nursing shift on her phone at the Baker Colony in Winnipeg.  She is one of a handful of Hutterite nurses in the province.</p>
</figcaption></figure>
<p>They have both seen the expressions of pleasant surprise on the faces of Hutterite patients when they realize that their nurse can comfort them in their dialect.			</p>
<p>“In a vulnerable space, just seeing my headscarf, seeing my dress, hearing my accent… (brings) relief to them. I’m happy to be there for them,” Judith says.			</p>
<p>Whenever she encounters a grateful Hutterite patient, she urges them to spread the word within their home colony to “gently encourage” more Hutterite nurses.			</p>
<p>“Then they hesitate, because it would take a change of mentality in the whole community. And that’s where the change has to happen,” says Judith.			</p>
<p>“I do what I can by talking to people, and I would like the colonies to recognize how fluid it is. I can keep my responsibilities (at home) and contribute a few days a week to the hospital.”			</p>
<p>Providing culturally appropriate care is only part of the reason women are advocating for more Hutterites in nursing.  Within the structure of the colony (which functions, as Judith puts it, like a “well-oiled machine”), they have financial and social supports to help them continue their education, and Hutterite patients depend on health care. provincial.			</p>
<figure class=



<p>MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p>
<p>Judith Maendel (left) and her sister-in-law Karissa Maendel at the Baker Colony in Winnipeg.  They are both informally on-call in the community to provide basic care (such as changing dressings) and have the assessment skills to recognize when a trip to the emergency room is needed.</p>
<p>“/>														
<br />
						</a>						
<figcaption>
<p>MIKAELA MACKENZIE / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS</p>
<p>Judith Maendel (left) and her sister-in-law Karissa Maendel at Baker Colony in Winnipeg.  They are both informally on-call in the community to provide basic care (such as changing dressings) and have the assessment skills to recognize when a trip to the emergency room is needed.</p>
</figcaption></figure>
<p>This aligns with their religious beliefs to give back to the wider community, and say Manitoba’s health care system could use this help.			</p>
<p>Leaving her colony “comfort zone” to become a nurse was tough, but it was worth it, says Karissa.  “You quickly discover that you can form a community anywhere.”			</p>
<p>After graduating in January, Karissa recounted her experience in a Facebook post.  She eloquently urged others in the wider Hutterite community to get health care training.			</p>
<p>“I’d be lying if I said it’s been easy. It’s been very hard. The kind of hard with regular alarms at 5:30 (am) and pots of coffee before sunrise,” she wrote, later highlighting the support offered by the colony.			</p>
<div class=

“I haven’t met a single person, none of my classmates, other working mothers, anyone, who had the support system in place that I had. From my gas and my vehicle to the meals prepared for my family and all financial and social needs in between, I was covered.”

“I would like the greater Hutterite community to extend this support and this vision beyond the boundaries of the community,” Karissa added in an interview with the Free presssaying she is particularly concerned about the province-wide shortage of nurses.

But change is on the way: two other members of the colony have signed up for health assistant courses.

Karissa says she hopes to be able to encourage Hutterite girls everywhere, including her two young daughters.

“My daughters said how proud they were, and I’m so grateful to be able to do it – just because they see me do it.”

katie.may@freepress.mb.ca

Katie May

]]> The current huge investment in the education sector is a step in the right direction – MP https://the-education-store.com/the-current-huge-investment-in-the-education-sector-is-a-step-in-the-right-direction-mp/ Sat, 14 May 2022 09:38:37 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/the-current-huge-investment-in-the-education-sector-is-a-step-in-the-right-direction-mp/ Dr Kingsley Nyarko Ghana’s current huge investment in the education sector is a step in the right direction since knowledge is the key to any country’s success, noted Dr. Kingsley Nyarko, MP for Kwadaso. “The administration headed by Nana Akufo-Addo is to be commended for the many initiatives launched over the past five years to […]]]>

Dr Kingsley Nyarko

Ghana’s current huge investment in the education sector is a step in the right direction since knowledge is the key to any country’s success, noted Dr. Kingsley Nyarko, MP for Kwadaso.

“The administration headed by Nana Akufo-Addo is to be commended for the many initiatives launched over the past five years to promote various literacy programs and academic activities.

“In fact, such bold initiatives are necessary for a developing country that seeks to catch up with the rest of the world in terms of socio-economic development and technological progress,” the MP said.

Dr Nyarko, who was speaking at a brief ceremony in Kwadaso, to hand over a brand new double-barreled photocopier to the Municipal Education Directorate, said research had indicated that the wealth of a country lay in the depth of its human resource base.

Therefore, stakeholders must join us as the government strives to resource educational institutions for quality education delivery at all levels.

According to him, for a country to get quality education, there must be investments in the sector to drive the socio-economic transformation of the nation.

The gesture, he said, was aimed at improving the work at the Municipal Education Directorate, assuring that he (MP) would continue to help advance the educational goals of the municipality.

Ms. Grace Ofosu Boateng, Director of Municipal Education, who received the article, expressed her gratitude to the MP for responding to the leadership’s call.

“Management urgently needed this copier because we had to copy from sheet to sheet, and it was affecting our work here in the office,” she said.

Send your news to newsghana101@gmail.com and via WhatsApp to +233 244244807
To follow Ghana News on Google News

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More foreign workers needed: Reclassifying companies into the service sector to address labor shortages, says industry leader https://the-education-store.com/more-foreign-workers-needed-reclassifying-companies-into-the-service-sector-to-address-labor-shortages-says-industry-leader/ Thu, 12 May 2022 18:03:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/more-foreign-workers-needed-reclassifying-companies-into-the-service-sector-to-address-labor-shortages-says-industry-leader/ SINGAPORE – The Singapore Business Federation (SBF) wants the government and relevant stakeholders to revise classifications within the service sector, so that companies that rely on foreign labor can hire more of these workers or redeploy workers who were in pandemic-related positions to rejoin the sector. These were among suggestions on how to tackle the […]]]>

SINGAPORE – The Singapore Business Federation (SBF) wants the government and relevant stakeholders to revise classifications within the service sector, so that companies that rely on foreign labor can hire more of these workers or redeploy workers who were in pandemic-related positions to rejoin the sector.

These were among suggestions on how to tackle the labor shortage in the sector, published in an SBF report published on Thursday (12 May).

Retailers who responded to the report told TODAY they support the proposal to review classifications within the sector. This is because the service industry includes many different areas such as food and beverage (F&B), waste management and finance, each with different needs and levels of dependence on labor. different foreign work.

However, some of them disagreed that workers in pandemic-related roles, such as safe-distancing ambassadors, can be easily redeployed to the service sector, as there are too few of them to fill the labor gaps and their skills may not match the situation. sector.

Other suggestions among the nine raised in the report include better “cross-industry collaboration” to achieve greater operational efficiency, for example by engaging logistics companies to make last-mile deliveries, rather than relying on delivery services. internal.

Another suggestion is for companies to work with unions and post-secondary institutions to train more workers and help retain them in the sector.

SBF said in the report that while the labor supply situation is expected to improve as Singapore comes to terms with Covid-19, that has not necessarily been the case for the service sector.

“The reality on the ground is a record increase in vacancies with the ramping up of economic activity, but has encountered difficulties in filling vacancies, which reflects the growing mismatch of skills and attitudes in the market. work,” the report said.

SBF’s Managing Director, Lam Yi Young, said: “To maintain Singapore’s reputation as an efficient and vibrant destination for business and leisure, service industries must have access to a workforce. appropriate and sufficient work to support their operations and even if they double down on automating processes and redesigning jobs, companies still need to be able to recruit and retain enough local and foreign workers. »

He added that SBF had worked with other trade associations and chambers on the report.

Mr Andrew Kwan, chairman of one such trade association, the Restaurant Association of Singapore, said: “As companies make concerted efforts to improve our employment supply to attract talent, shortages of Short-term manpower needs to be resolved in order for operations to resume and scale up.”

In the longer term, labor policies will have to “reflect the changing structure of the resident labor force with the increasing affluence of households and the higher qualifications of the more young,” he added.

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Kinlochbervie students among first to benefit from space sector STEM learning https://the-education-store.com/kinlochbervie-students-among-first-to-benefit-from-space-sector-stem-learning/ Tue, 10 May 2022 18:27:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/kinlochbervie-students-among-first-to-benefit-from-space-sector-stem-learning/ Space module delivered to Kinlochbervie High School with SSA’s Scott O’Hara. Photo: Angus Mackay/HIE Highland students have the opportunity to launch an early career in the growing space sector. The Science Skills Academy (SSA), a pioneering science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education program, strives to help young people develop skills for the future. The […]]]>

Space module delivered to Kinlochbervie High School with SSA’s Scott O’Hara. Photo: Angus Mackay/HIE

Highland students have the opportunity to launch an early career in the growing space sector.

The Science Skills Academy (SSA), a pioneering science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education program, strives to help young people develop skills for the future.

The Highlands and Islands are at the forefront of Scotland’s space industry, with Space Hub Sutherland aiming to launch its first satellite within the next few years.

The spaceport, along with another in Shetland, have received planning permission and development is well underway. Moray-based rocket maker Orbex, which will launch from Space Hub Sutherland, in A’Mhoine near Tongue, has already created around 60 highly skilled jobs.

When careers in fields such as research, data analytics, manufacturing supply chain and service industries are taken into account, the space sector seems poised to create a wide variety of job opportunities in the area, many of which will be occupied by people who are currently in school.

SSA wants young people in the region to be more aware of the sector and help them develop relevant STEM skills.

Its space-themed activity, focusing on launch activity, rockets, satellites and data collection and application, will be delivered on SSA’s Highland Newton Venue Network and is available to all S1 and S2 pupils from the Highland Council region.

Students will learn about a variety of skills required to work in the industry, ranging from design and engineering, to programming, logical thinking and teamwork. They will learn about the Space Hub Sutherland and the rockets that will be launched there, the satellites designed and built in Scotland, and how the data collected by these satellites will be used in real-world applications such as monitoring climate change.

Emma Robertson, SSA Project Manager, said: “SSA’s new space module will be a great experience for students at Highland Schools.

“Through hands-on activities focused on topics such as physics, materials testing and design technology, coding and data processing, they will discover new skills and strengths necessary for the growth of the space industry in Scotland.

“By introducing young people to this emerging field and its wide range of opportunities and career paths, we are highlighting the leading role that the Highlands and Islands play in STEM sectors that are important locally, nationally and global.”

Roy Kirk, Highlands and Islands Enterprise Project Manager, Space Hub Sutherland, who met pupils in Kinlochbervie last month, said: “Our northern location helps make the Highlands and Islands the best place in the UK to launch rockets to put satellites into orbit, and there’s a lot more to the space business than that.

“As a development agency, our goal is to use the opportunity presented by spaceports in our region to support a very wide range of new jobs that could have a significant impact on the economy.

“In the North Highlands and Moray alone, research commissioned by HIE and Dounreay Site Restoration Ltd has shown that around 740 jobs could be created by the end of this decade and generate an economic boost of £56million. sterling per year.

“When young people choose the subjects they want to study, it’s important that they know what the careers of tomorrow will look like, and space is a sector with enormous potential in a range of exciting subjects.”

The SSA is a partnership project led by HIE with £3 million in funding from the Scottish Government under the Inverness and Highland City-Region agreement. The project established the Highland Newton Room Network, made up of five STEM educational institutions across Highland.

In addition to the Space module, SSA has developed other resources including films, available on the SSA YouTube channel, which focus on the Scottish space sector as well as the career paths of employees working in the field.

The first activities of the Space module were given at the end of April to S2 students from Culloden Academy at the Inverness Newton Room, and to S1-S3 students from Kinlochbervie High School at the Pop-Up Newton Room.


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The sector must attract talent https://the-education-store.com/the-sector-must-attract-talent/ Mon, 09 May 2022 02:57:18 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/the-sector-must-attract-talent/ The global agricultural sector faces significant challenges in meeting demand as it approaches 2050. It is estimated that by the middle of this century, agriculture will need to provide food and fiber to nearly 10 billion people. According to the Gap Initiative report from the Virginia Tech College of Agriculture and Life Sciences in the […]]]>

The global agricultural sector faces significant challenges in meeting demand as it approaches 2050.

It is estimated that by the middle of this century, agriculture will need to provide food and fiber to nearly 10 billion people.

According to the Gap Initiative report from the Virginia Tech College of Agriculture and Life Sciences in the United States: consumers need more nutritious, affordable and safe food; producers seek innovation to help them overcome climate change and natural resource constraints; and the entire agri-food value chain must rapidly adopt new practices and tools that contribute to a healthy and sustainable world.

A strategy is needed that focuses on the sustainable growth of agricultural productivity to meet current and future demands, while protecting the environment and ensuring the productive sustainability of the agricultural sector for future generations.

Agricultural productivity increases when farmers implement technologies and production practices that produce more crops and livestock from fewer resources.

According to a position paper from the International Agribusiness Network, a key element in supporting increased agricultural productivity is to engage young agricultural leaders and equip them with the knowledge, resources and access to markets needed to produce and distribute food to feed the world. .

However, in Australia we seem to be missing the mark.

Since the early 2000s we have seen a decline in the availability of agricultural graduates in Australia, often due to the perception that agricultural careers were unattractive and career opportunities were limited.

The 2016 Australian Census highlights the agricultural sector’s difficulty in attracting the brightest minds, with most of the agricultural workforce holding no recognized non-academic qualifications.

Indeed, 55% of the agricultural workforce was made up of employees with no qualifications beyond secondary school, compared to 33% of the Australian workforce as a whole.

Employees with certificates and higher degrees were broadly similar between the agricultural industry and the overall Australian workplace.

However, the number of employees with a bachelor’s degree was significantly lower in the agricultural sector (10%) compared to the overall Australian workforce (22%).

A similar disparity was found at postgraduate level: 2% in the agricultural sector versus 7% in the overall workforce.

A 2017 study by the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development (DPIRD) in Western Australia found that benefits for agricultural graduates, such as job security, job variety, competitive salaries and an industry that embraces innovation, are not well understood by dropouts.

The DPIRD study also listed the following reasons given by young people for not considering a career in agriculture.

• Not be from an agricultural background.

• Reluctance to relocate to a regional area.

• Unaware of the jobs available in the agricultural industry.

• Can make more money in a different industry.

• The agricultural sector lacks technology/innovation.

A 2010 report by Pratley and Hay indicated that there were at least six agricultural jobs for every agricultural graduate and that the lack of availability of suitable jobs threatened the sustainability of agricultural industries in Australia.

“[It is crucial to] reframe agriculture as an intellectually, socially and financially rewarding business choice, as well as one in which young people can have an incredible impact on issues such as climate change, hunger, displacement, poverty and more again,” the International Agri-Food Network reported in 2018.

Currently, working in the agricultural sector is perceived by many school leavers as ‘just being a farmer’.

While it is understood within the agricultural sector that farming is a crucial aspect of the industry that underpins all other off-farm employment opportunities, it is not the only role in the Agriculture. In order to attract our brightest minds, the agricultural sector must promote the wider range of interesting and varied career options that fall under the banner of the agricultural industry.

• Matt Dalgleish is Head of Commodity Markets Information at Thomas Elder Markets (TEM)

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Tamil Nadu: Health sector needs post-pandemic booster shot | Chennai News https://the-education-store.com/tamil-nadu-health-sector-needs-post-pandemic-booster-shot-chennai-news/ Sat, 07 May 2022 04:26:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/tamil-nadu-health-sector-needs-post-pandemic-booster-shot-chennai-news/ As Chief Minister MK Stalin Completes a year in the office, YOU, in a series of articles, examines how the DMK Government has done on various fronts. Today: HealthAfter facing waves of delta and omicron variants, Tamil Nadu’s healthcare system is slowly returning to normal. But experts say that without significant immediate intervention, it could […]]]>
As Chief Minister MK Stalin Completes a year in the office, YOU, in a series of articles, examines how the DMK Government has done on various fronts. Today: Health
After facing waves of delta and omicron variants, Tamil Nadu’s healthcare system is slowly returning to normal. But experts say that without significant immediate intervention, it could take years for the state to repair the damage caused by the pandemic.
With the state now only seeing a small number of new Covid-19 cases each day, doctors say Tamil Nadu is more likely to face systemic challenges with much more complex and chronic illnesses. “Over the past two years, there have been retractions in preventative checks, elective surgeries and, in several cases, even emergency care, resulting in increased morbidity and mortality,” said the director of public health, Dr. TS Selvavinayagam. A Lancet study, which he co-authored, showed how excess deaths in the city of Chennai led to a drop in life expectancy of almost four years during the pandemic years. Although there is no data on the effect of excess deaths on life expectancy in all districts, the situation, according to Dr Selvavinayagam, is likely to be similar.
Experts say the state’s health care system won’t collapse, but delayed diagnosis and treatment could become routine. This can lead to increased complications, higher medical costs and poor outcomes, mainly for people with chronic conditions and the elderly – one of the main challenges that the DMK government identified during the first months of its governance. .
Therefore, he initiated ‘makkalai thedi maruthuvam’ and revived ‘Varummun Kappom’, Health Minister Ma Subramanian said. The “Varammun Kappom” program will offer preventive screening to people through mobile camps in cities, semi-urban, hilly and rural areas. The “makkalai thedi maruthuvam” program will provide services, including drug delivery, dialysis, physiotherapy and palliative care, at home. “The goal is to reduce complications and deaths from non-communicable diseases with minimal cost to people. We don’t want them to skip a day’s pay to go to the hospital for treatment or postpone treatment,” Subramanian said.
More than 60,000 people received home care and more than 1,000 medical camps were organized in less than a year. “It’s a good start, but policymakers shouldn’t assume they’re closer to the finish line,” said T Sundararaman, public health expert and former director of the National Health Systems Resource Center. The state must focus and invest more in preventive primary health care if it wants to improve health indices, he said.
“But unfortunately we are seeing a reduction in health care benefits this year,” he added. H Allocations for the health department in the state budget for 2022-23 at Rs 17,901. 73 crore is Rs 1,000 crore lower than the revised budget for 202122. The finance department gave two reasons to reduction, including a steady decline in Covid-19 cases. He said the funds he allocated for the creation of 11 new medical schools in 2021 need not be carried over to 2022. But the 6% reduction in allocations worries many health experts, who want more funds for primary health care centres.
In recent discussions of the state’s health care needs, members of the state’s planning commission recommended 70 percent of the primary and preventative care allocation for communicable, noncommunicable, and reproductive health. Senior vascular surgeon Dr J Amalorpavanathan, who is one of the members of the planning commission, said the commission had recommended an expansion of services in primary care centers, where there are nearly 25,000 beds . “In addition to maternal and child care, we should expand services for the prevention and management of diseases such as diabetes and hypertension,” he said.

Giving muscle to primary health care is likely to improve health outcomes, in addition to drawing crowds away from tertiary care settings. “If only people in need come to the big centres, the quality of care and services will improve. Covid has taught us to reserve beds in major hospitals for people who need this type of care,” said director of medical training, Dr R Narayanababu.
The health department has identified fixes for several weak joints in tertiary care – establishment of a multi-specialty hospital in Guindy as there are no government hospitals in South Chennai, construction of a huge cancer hospital in Kancheepuram and expansion of the mental health institute into a mental health and neuroscience institute.
The wait continues for state health policy, however. “It’s important because it helps establish guidelines that benefit patients, healthcare organizations and our healthcare system. Having protocols in place can help prevent human error and miscommunication around medical decisions,” Dr Sundararaman said.
The state initiated the process, Health Secretary J Radhakrishnan said. A group of experts is working to write a policy that will not only help health care providers and administrators, but also provide the best patient care and gather evidence to inform future policies. On a broader level, it will help patients understand benefits and rights.
Email your comments to the South Pole. you@timesgroup.com

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On the challenges of the education sector https://the-education-store.com/on-the-challenges-of-the-education-sector/ Wed, 04 May 2022 23:11:05 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/on-the-challenges-of-the-education-sector/ ALL entities that make up Nigeria are unquestionably displaced. We have gradually, through decades of corruption, economic recession, poor leadership, insecurity, acts of terrorism and more ineffable acts, depleted the quality of the sectors that constituted our values. One of those important sectors of education. The need for education in a country can hardly be […]]]>

ALL entities that make up Nigeria are unquestionably displaced. We have gradually, through decades of corruption, economic recession, poor leadership, insecurity, acts of terrorism and more ineffable acts, depleted the quality of the sectors that constituted our values. One of those important sectors of education. The need for education in a country can hardly be overstated; education is the mold in which the offspring of societies are cast, and the quality of education today is the determinant of our future. Just as Abraham Lincoln said, the philosophy of the classroom in one generation will be the philosophy of government in the next. So why has this indispensable entity of our society been neglected? The importance of education in our country seems to have been forgotten. Students (even parents) seem to care only about grand certificates and not about integral knowledge: we have lost sight of what is and ignored what must be treated as imperative. We have become virtual time travelers destroying the future before it arrives.

There are many instances where Nigerians have ignored the value of quality education for ‘certificates’. Exam malpractice has been an endemic and resilient antagonist of quality education for as long as education itself has been established, but the rate at which it is growing is greater than ever now. What is mystifying and troubling about this act is its general acceptance in our societies today. It is no longer surreptitious that many high school students are aided by their teachers and principals to engage in unfaithful and degrading acts during their WAEC and NECO exams. In most cases, students are asked to pay for the supposed “Expo” and their parents blindly help fund them with money to pay. It is even more troubling that the official supervisors charged by these examination boards to oversee and regulate the examinations and prevent malpractice mainly help the acts once their pockets are lined. And these unqualified and unprepared students are ushered into universities with these results knowing full well that it is a facade. Unlike in the past where results are proof of excellence, they are no longer. The depraved students are robbed of the confidence to wield the durability of the piece of paper they carry, thus leaving them defenseless when offered jobs as they lost their M16s and bulletproof vests long ago.

IN CASE YOU MISSED THESE FROM NIGERIAN TRIBUNE

Moreover, the insignificance of education can easily be attributed to the nonchalant attitude of the government towards the education of Nigerian students. The Nigerian government openly shows contempt for education; in front of ASUU trillions of naira, slowing down the rate at which the dispersal of valuable education to Nigerian students occurs. Staying at home for months or even years reduces the citizen’s consideration for quality learning. The government, by not providing enough employment opportunities, also reduces the importance of education for Nigerian students as they spend more years than expected on a course without any hope of being employed. The lack of necessary and standardized equipment for learning in secondary and tertiary institutions, making schools more boring and unsophisticated, has also contributed to this enemy.

The drastic fall in the importance of education in Nigeria has opened the doors to other malign insurgencies. This uncomfortable situation in education results in the engagement of idle students in illicit and impermissible activities like cybercrimes, armed robberies and the killing of people for ritual purposes. Some even drop out of school and become available instruments used by politicians or the highest bidder for evil deeds. Sometimes depraved and unqualified students enter politics by becoming our leaders without being neurophysiologically ready and sufficiently equipped to handle a situation. The situation is therefore metastatically cancerous.

Government, students, parents and the country as a whole must revive the dying importance of education in this country. We are laying the foundations today for the mansion of tomorrow with quality and effective education serving as the mold with which the bricks are cast. Students should prioritize learning over grades and certificates. The mentally sophisticated individuals thus produced will greatly improve this country.

  • Félix is ​​a student in the Department of Medicine at LAUTECH.

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Partners come together to modernize the education sector https://the-education-store.com/partners-come-together-to-modernize-the-education-sector/ Mon, 02 May 2022 22:00:03 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/partners-come-together-to-modernize-the-education-sector/ Geneva, Switzerland – September 3, 2020: Headquarters of the Regional Office for Europe and Central Asia of UNICEF, a United Nations agency created in 1946 to improve the condition of children around the world. BY NKOSENTSHA KHUMALOThe United Nations Children’s Emergency Fund (Unicef) Zimbabwe has teamed up with various partners to modernize the education sector […]]]>

Geneva, Switzerland – September 3, 2020: Headquarters of the Regional Office for Europe and Central Asia of UNICEF, a United Nations agency created in 1946 to improve the condition of children around the world.

BY NKOSENTSHA KHUMALO
The United Nations Children’s Emergency Fund (Unicef) Zimbabwe has teamed up with various partners to modernize the education sector by modifying the Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance (Giga) project which aims to connect all schools to Internet.

This was revealed last Thursday in Bulawayo at a business engagement meeting hosted by Unicef ​​at the Zimbabwe International Trade Fair (ZITF).

One of the initiatives, Zimbabwe Businesses 4 Children (ZB4C) Giga, a joint initiative between the government, Unicef ​​and the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) is expected to connect all schools to the internet by 2030.

UNICEF representative Tajudeen Oyewale said NewsDay that the platform will also support child development initiatives.

“Our plan is to convene a Businesses 4 Children Council which will serve as a platform to co-create ideas for and with children and advance the child-friendly principle.

“While there are several initiatives and options that we can explore together, I am pleased that the Giga initiative provides a broad platform to advance the current progress that Zimbabwe has made in innovation and education. . For GIGA, we see continued investment and support for clean energy projects. »

Oyewale urged the private sector to support digitization efforts with learning materials and other investments.

Speaking at the same event, Minister for Primary and Secondary Education, Evelyn Ndlovu, said: “This is the new solution to ensure that children are equipped with 21st century learning skills and can develop the necessary skills that many businesses and societies need. The Learning Passport, which was launched amid and at the height of COVID-19 and school closures, has given over 100,000 learners access to locally developed learning materials as well as to other internationally developed learning resources.

She said the offline server linked to the learning passport would reduce data costs for schools and allow teachers and learners to access thousands of learning resources.

Ndlovu said 150 schools have so far received solar power.

Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Minister Jenfan Muswere said his ministry was expanding its national e-learning strategy by providing free internet access to
schools.

“Giga’s objective and complement is to provide the required ICT infrastructure for all schools, especially those in remote areas of the country, to enable them to connect to the Internet. Our Internet penetration rate is currently 59% and every effort is being made to reach 100% which access – I believe – is a right and not a privilege hence our interest in this initiative,” Muswere said.

  • Follow us on Twitter @NewsDayZimbabwe

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Experts discuss the future of Qatar’s tech sector https://the-education-store.com/experts-discuss-the-future-of-qatars-tech-sector/ Sun, 01 May 2022 06:03:00 +0000 https://the-education-store.com/experts-discuss-the-future-of-qatars-tech-sector/ Qatar’s tech sector, which is set to grow further, offers immense opportunities for businesses, experts said during a webinar. Tasmu Digital Valley and Berlin Partner hosted a webinar titled “Back to Global – Berlin Startups Explore Opportunities in Qatar” where panelists shared their views on the future of Qatar’s tech sector and its opportunities. The […]]]>

Qatar’s tech sector, which is set to grow further, offers immense opportunities for businesses, experts said during a webinar. Tasmu Digital Valley and Berlin Partner hosted a webinar titled “Back to Global – Berlin Startups Explore Opportunities in Qatar” where panelists shared their views on the future of Qatar’s tech sector and its opportunities. The experts also shared their views on how to develop Qatar’s digital ecosystem.
Addressing the event on the support QFC offers to startups interested in coming to Qatar and non-Qatari entrepreneurs, Jahongirbek Burhonov, Vice President of Business Development at QFC, said, “We have our own regulatory environment in which we base ourselves in English common law jurisdiction. and we have our own commercial jurisdiction and international dispute resolution tribunal. Thus, this whole ecosystem makes it possible to settle in Qatar and to access these opportunities.
Burhonov explained QFC’s role in the fintech industry as well as trends and opportunities. “As QFC, we work closely with Qatar Fintech Hub and cohorts come to us to settle and take advantage of opportunities in Qatar. In the financial sector, we can also see that e-commerce is growing strongly in Qatar and the use of payment is growing as we have many payment gateways, which creates an opportunity to attract business. Technology such as Blockchain is also growing.
Danny Ramadan, Chief Investment Officer at QSTP, said: “Over the past 12-13 years, we have tried to master all aspects of the innovation value chain. We’ve launched our own accelerator that helps budding founding teams. Our incubator has around thirty high-tech startups.
Speaking about the venture capital fund, he noted, “We have launched a venture capital fund called the technology venture capital fund and we have the ability to direct seed investments that are cultivated not only in the ecosystem of the Qatar Foundation, but also in the wider ecosystem. We have been able to recognize that this market may be small in number, but the opportunities are significant. Qatar has taken some very interesting initiatives on board, whether it’s the future of city life through entities like Lusail or Msherieb and the technology deployed to support the upcoming World Cup, in the field health understand the future of precision medicine by launching national programs and by sequencing genomes and building biobanks. These initiatives create their own gravity and allow international startups to access these opportunities.
Responding to a question about the FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022, he pointed out that development will continue after the World Cup and that the World Cup is coming to an end, it does not mean that the progress that is happening in the local ecosystem and the wider economy will come to an end.

There are certain global trends that Qatar is well placed to capitalize on. Thus, these trends indicate where the broader economy has invested and engaged in precision healthcare in a significant way.
“Qatar has played a leading role in running the Qatar Genome program, which allows us tremendous access to data from these genomes. Qatar should benefit from this because it has made a significant commitment and is benefiting from it now. There is a a number of sectors where the foundation and the broader economy have made commitments in areas where the market is going to grow in the next five to ten years, so I don’t think the World Cup is the end, but it is the start of a more knowledge- and innovation-driven stage of the economy,” he added.
Vlad Vlaicu, Senior Manager ICT and Business Development, Ooredoo discussed ICT and Telecom and the whole network support in terms of infrastructure.
Responding to a question on how Ooreodo builds Qatar’s startup system and helps startups grow in Qatar, Vlaicu said, “Ooredoo is the leading provider of telecommunications and ICT. We are trying to transform Qatar into a smart and digital nation. Together with MCIT, we provide the Tasmu platform – the digital nation. As Ooredoo, we have a full range of connectivity products and services, we build and host Microsoft, Google platforms.
“We are the anchor in connectivity, cloud and IoT services and we are leaders in terms of new services and technologies and are always open with our partners to bring new solutions and businesses to Qatar. The way we do it as Ooredoo, we have our own startup acceleration programs and different initiatives. We are always open to new ideas. Qatar is a very dynamic market, it is small but very dynamic,” he added.
About the FIFA World Cup in Qatar, he noted, Qatar has many other events or plans and the National Vision 2030 has five different pillars that Qatar is focusing on such as education , transport and construction, sports. Qatar will host the 2030 Asian Games and many other events will be held, so this is just the start. There is a lot of potential for new business ideas that Qatar is looking into.

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